Friday 30 September 2016

How times have changed: Check out these old photos of the first ever Dublin Pride festivals

Published 23/06/2016 | 15:03

Gay Pride1980, picnic at Merrion Square. Photo by Thomas A. O'Shea.
It is a condition of use that all photos are © credited to the photographer, courtesy Irish Queer Archive/National Library of Ireland.
Gay Pride1980, picnic at Merrion Square. Photo by Thomas A. O'Shea. It is a condition of use that all photos are © credited to the photographer, courtesy Irish Queer Archive/National Library of Ireland.
The line-up for Gay Pride Week 1983
Tommy pictured at the Gay Pride Parade in 1984
Tonie Walsh speaking at Gay Pride in 1983
Gay Pride Day Protest, 27 June 1974, outside the Department of Justice. Photo by Gareth Miller. It is a condition of use that all photos are © credited to the photographer, courtesy Irish Queer Archive/National Library of Ireland.

It’s been 43 years since Dublin’s first ever Pride Parade marched its way from St Stephen’s Green to the GPO for the first time and old photographs from the monumental day reflect just how much things have changed since June 1983.

  • Go To

Last year saw more than 50,000 people take to the streets of Dublin celebrating Ireland’s historical marriage equality referendum, but in 1983, just 200 members of LGBT community marched in sombre circumstances. Homosexuality was yet to be decriminalised and the community had recently been dealt a significant blow following the ruling in the case of Declan Flynn, who was died in Fairview Park following a brutal attack motivated by his sexual orientation.

Read more: Dublin Pride 2016 festival theme gives a nod to David Bowie and the 1916 Rising rebels

Tonie Walsh, Independent Curator of the Irish Queer Archive at the National Gallery and an activist who spoke at the Gay Pride Parade in 1983 noted how the festival has grown throughout its long history.

The line-up for Gay Pride Week 1983
The line-up for Gay Pride Week 1983
Tommy pictured at the Gay Pride Parade in 1984
Tonie Walsh speaking at Gay Pride in 1983
Gay Pride Day Protest, 27 June 1974, outside the Department of Justice. Photo by Gareth Miller. It is a condition of use that all photos are © credited to the photographer, courtesy Irish Queer Archive/National Library of Ireland.

“Less than 200 people marched in the first Pride parade in 1983, where Joni Crone lead gave the lead speech. Grafton Street had recently been pedestrianised, but we were told we weren’t to march down it. However, we insisted. We wanted our day in the sun. If I remember correct, the complete budget for Gay Pride Week in 1983 was about £300.

“Panti made a good point in the aftermath of last year’s referendum, when she was commended for her role in securing marriage equality which was that this movement was first started back in 1974 by eight or ten brave people who protested outside the Department of Justice and made it possible for this annual festival to be what it is today.”

Although the parade took a hiatus for many years, the march has become a much-celebrated marking in Dublin’s diary throughout the past three decades and Ireland’s recent embrace of equality has made the occasion that much more special for the nation.

This weekend sees the annual festival return to the capital but the line up 1983, which featured wine and cheese tastings, picnics and board game nights, is vastly different to 2016’s ‘This is Us’ line up which includes  cabarets, champagne breakfasts and a ceremony of remembrance of those lost along the path to equality.

Tommy pictured at the Gay Pride Parade in 1984
Tommy pictured at the Gay Pride Parade in 1984
The line-up for Gay Pride Week 1983
Tonie Walsh speaking at Gay Pride in 1983
Gay Pride Day Protest, 27 June 1974, outside the Department of Justice. Photo by Gareth Miller. It is a condition of use that all photos are © credited to the photographer, courtesy Irish Queer Archive/National Library of Ireland.

Toni admitted that the Gay Pride events in the Eighties had an “innocence” and consisted of picnics and even group trips to Glendalough.

“I remember being kicked out of a bar on Dame Street in 1981 for holding my boyfriend’s hand nonchalantly. The manager said ‘I don’t want your kind in here’. The picnics had sort of an innocence about them, and allowed the LGBT community, which was becoming ever more diverse year on year, to socialise without alcohol,” said Tonie.

Dublin Pride Parade takes place on Saturday, June 25.

Adam Smolarek & Salvatore Candela both from the City Centre during the Dublin LGBTQ Pride Parade 2015 in Dublin's City Centre.
Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Adam Smolarek & Salvatore Candela both from the City Centre during the Dublin LGBTQ Pride Parade 2015 in Dublin's City Centre. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Life