Sunday 25 June 2017

Victorian home right on the beach in Howth can be yours for €925k

Beach life beckons at Victorian seafront home in Howth

Sharavogue, at the right hand side of the terrace, offers seafront living
Sharavogue, at the right hand side of the terrace, offers seafront living
One of the upstairs bedrooms
The sun room dining room comes with a tiled floor
The front of the house which shows the last remaining 'gum boil' support bay window in the terrace
The rear garden with its quaint summer house
The front reception room
The timber-floored back reception room leading to the sun room
Mark Keenan

Mark Keenan

Howth people are extraordinarily peninsular.

It can be a tricky task indeed to extricate them from their north Dublin base. This marked reluctance to move goes back before the Vikings to the times of Ptolemy who mapped it as the isle of Edros in the 2nd Century AD.

Howth was likely an island then, which later linked up the mainland via a tombolo sand spit, now Sutton Cross.

The Vikings first caught sight of what they called 'Hoved' (Hoved is Norse for head) when they trashed the monastery on Lambay Island in 795 during their first excursion to Ireland. They invaded Howth - by then a peninsula - in 819, recognising the value of its harbour long before they established Dublin itself.

The sun room dining room comes with a tiled floor
The sun room dining room comes with a tiled floor

After the Battle of Clontarf in 1014, their remnants retreated back to the security of the peninsula where they hung on resolutely for 150 more years.

They sailed in and out, and maybe even established fish restaurants and invented golf - but otherwise kept very much to themselves.

These days you can't blame the locals for a reluctance to budge out of their virtual island domain given that they've got pretty much all they want on their doorsteps.

Howth has some of the city's most startling seaside scenery, beaches and cliffs for walks, and some of Dublin's best seafood restaurants and pubs.Among the restaurants is the well known Deep - a waterfront seafood eaterie which has dazzled the locals since 2005 with its dishes, in particular its locally supplied lobster.

Deep is owned by Brendan and Debbie O'Connor who moved to their own seafront home here in 2005, at 5 Corr Bridge Terrace, Claremont Road, in Howth.

Brendan is also an accomplished upholsterer and for many years supplied high class furniture work for the law sector in particular.

The front of the house which shows the last remaining 'gum boil' support bay window in the terrace
The front of the house which shows the last remaining 'gum boil' support bay window in the terrace

While this row of five homes might appear to date from the late 20th Century, it was actually built to a design ahead of its time in the 1860s.

The seafront land was acquired by the Baskins of Kinsealy from the St Lawrence's of Howth Castle, and the former embarked on a development of five exclusive holiday homes which they sold to wealthy city centre-based families - perhaps the first case of "blow ins" at Howth since the Norse made themselves at home.

Interestingly, the O'Connor's home, Sharavogue, at number 5 on the end, which has just been placed for sale through Gallagher Quigley, is the only one to still feature the original 'gum boil' upper floor bay window more typically found in homes of the period throughout the UK. Since the war many of the projecting windows were removed entirely after falling into disrepair.

It is also the only house which has not been passed through the same family for generations, such is the reluctance of owners to move.

This stretch is home to a number of Ireland's luminaries including Larry Mullen Jnr of U2 who has accumulated a number of properties here, the Celtic artist Jim FitzPatrick who lives at the Avalon (fittingly) development, and former Attorney General Harry Whelehan.The O'Connors refurbished the property over many years to create a peacefully atmospheric abode. Accommodation includes the entrance hall off which is a newly fitted shower room.

Then there's the living room with a granite hearth chimney piece and timber floors. It leads through via double doors to the sitting room which has a decorative cast iron chimney piece with a granite hearth.

The front reception room
The front reception room

This in turn leads to the tiled sun room and dining room with double doors out to the rear garden patio.

The fitted kitchen has an island unit and there's a utility off this. Upstairs are four bedrooms and a home office, as well as a good-sized family bathroom. Three of these rooms have coastal views.

The floors are solid timber throughout and the windows are double glazed Marvin hardwoods. The rear garden has a patio and a cute summer house at the end.

Immortalised in James Joyce's Ulysses, Howth is a bustling village that offers attractions like Howth Castle, the National Transport Museum, the Martello Tower which long housed the Hurdy Gurdy Radio Museum, and the Baily Lighthouse. Wildlife enthusiasts will love the gulls and gannets, guillemots, razorbills, fulmars, and grey seals. For walkers, there are four spectacular cliff walk loops.

But the real point of living here at Corr Bridge Terrace, as the Victorian Baskin developers twigged, is the Burrow beach which runs for a kilometre from Sutton Cross to Howth Village in what must be one of the best warm-up strolls for a seafood supper that there is. And if you buy No.5 (asking price €925,000), there's a fair chance of a free lobster dinner waiting for you to tuck into at the end of it.

Sharavogue 5 Corr Bridge Terrace,

The timber-floored back reception room leading to the sun room
The timber-floored back reception room leading to the sun room

Howth, Co Dublin

Asking price: €925,000

Agent: Gallagher Quigley, (01) 818300

Indo Property

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