Tuesday 17 October 2017

Gorgeous city home with Botanical Gardens on its doorstep on the market for €495k

 

No 17 Prospect Square has a spacious open-plan living/dining area in a modern extension that has retained the rough rendered brick, granite lintel and cast iron column of the original house
No 17 Prospect Square has a spacious open-plan living/dining area in a modern extension that has retained the rough rendered brick, granite lintel and cast iron column of the original house
The Gravediggers pub is closeby.
The kitchen is fitted with a Rayburn cooker that heats the radiators
No 17 Prospect Square.
The wood-burning stove in the dining/living area.

Katy McGuinness

With Glasnevin Cemetery and Botanic Gardens on its doorstep, No 17 Prospect Square offers polished city living.

John Kavanagh's is said to be the oldest family pub in the city, with the current owners being the sixth generation behind the bar since it opened its doors in 1833. Better known as The Gravediggers, it's the place where the mourners at Paddy Dignam's funeral repaired in James Joyce's Ulysses, and where cemetery workers came for a well-deserved pint of the black stuff after a hard day's work. Local lore has it that they would knock on the wall of the pub with a special code to order their drinks.

A warren of wooden snugs looks as if it is untouched since first installed. The Gravediggers is a step back in time, a hostelry where you'll find no music, piped or otherwise, nor - perish the thought - sport on the telly.

A couple of weeks ago, Glen Hansard dropped in for a quiet pint with Eddie Vedder after the latter's show at the 3Arena, but there was no singing.

The Gravediggers pub is closeby.
The Gravediggers pub is closeby.

Across the green, which would have originally formed the main access route and marshalling area at the entrance to the cemetery, is 17 Prospect Square, an attractive three-bedroom Edwardian house dating from around 1905 with 1184 sq ft of living space.

The houses in the square were speculatively built at a time when the city was expanding rapidly, and were aimed at the skilled lower classes, such as artisans and clerks, most of whom bought the houses they lived in.

According to the Property Price Register, the current owners paid €431,011 for No. 17 in late 2014, and now that they are moving away from Dublin it is back on the market - with a price tag of €495,000. Sixty parties came to see the property on its first Saturday open viewing so it's reasonable to assume that the asking price is likely to be exceeded.

The current owners say that they have changed very little about the house in the two-and-a-half years in which they have lived there. The front room on the ground floor is a double bedroom, and to the back is the kitchen (fitted with a Rayburn cooker that heats the radiators), which in turn leads on to a spacious open-plan living/dining area in a modern extension that has retained the rough rendered brick, granite lintel and cast iron column of the original house. There's a a wood-burning stove, French doors out to the south-facing courtyard garden, and a nifty arrangement of guest lavatory and utility room.

Upstairs on the return is a large family bathroom, with separate shower and bath. There are two further bedrooms, with the master spanning the width of the house to the front.

Prospect Square lies off Prospect Avenue, behind the picture-perfect De Courcy Square, with its central railed garden given over to allotments for residents of that square since World War 1. These are so much in demand by GIY-ers that residents have no entitlement to an allotment per se, just an entitlement to go on the waiting list for one.

The kitchen is fitted with a Rayburn cooker that heats the radiators
The kitchen is fitted with a Rayburn cooker that heats the radiators

The two squares, together with a few surrounding streets, were designated an Architectural Conservation Area in 2007, which means that it is Dublin City Council policy to encourage residents to reinstate features such as timber sash windows and Bangor slate roof tiles where the original and historic features have been lost.

The area lies in a townland called Prospect which, in the 18th century, was pasture land situated south of the River Tolka.

"In 1832, as a result of a campaign for a Catholic cemetery led by Daniel O'Connell," states Dublin City's report on the area, "Prospect Cemetery was established here; this later became better known as Glasnevin Cemetery. O'Connell and many other patriots are buried there and the round tower that is the O'Connell Monument is a landmark feature in the general area. The original entrance to Glasnevin Cemetery was located in Prospect Square… Prospect Avenue was constructed to link the new Glasnevin Road with the entrance to the cemetery and was originally called Cemetery Road… The new avenue was used not only by people attending funerals but also by people using the cemetery for leisure purposes, for promenading along the tree-lined avenues and admiring the monuments on Sundays."

No 17 is at the end of the terrace on the south side of the square, and the lane that runs alongside it is a shortcut that leads through the cemetery to the Botanic Gardens. The current owners have carried on the traditions of the past, and say that they walk there most weekends, and that both the cemetery and the gardens are a constant delight.

This area of Dublin has started to come into its own in recent years in terms of restaurants. Around the corner from Prospect Square, beside Hart's Corner, is EatGreek, a simple modern restaurant serving some of the most authentic Greek food in the city. McMahon's of Botanic is a popular local café, a cut above the run of the mill, while Two Boys Brew in nearby Phibsboro does a good job keeping millennials in avocado toast and Chemex coffee. Woodstock, also in Phibsboro, is another perennial favourite.

17 Prospect Square

No 17 Prospect Square.
No 17 Prospect Square.

Glasnevin, Dublin 9

Asking price: €495,000

Agent: DNG (01) 8300989

Indo Property

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