Monday 26 September 2016

De Valera era home in Dublin modernised to sell for €550k

Thoroughly modern home in a period crafted setting, writes Mark Keenan

Published 09/09/2016 | 02:30

192 Collins Avenue in Beaumont, Dublin 9 has the characteristic red-brick frontage, recessed arch porch and double height bay window columns
192 Collins Avenue in Beaumont, Dublin 9 has the characteristic red-brick frontage, recessed arch porch and double height bay window columns
The master bedroom
The back garden with an Indian sandstone patio
The bespoke kitchen and breakfast room with an island breakfast bar unit
The interlinking reception rooms - living room and sitting room
The inter linking sitting room

The year 1938, in which Collins Avenue in Drumcondra was built, is only a few generations behind us but at the same time it's as far removed from modern era Ireland as you can get. But it was also a year of housing shortages.

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In that year Eamon De Valera was elected Taoiseach and Douglas Hyde became president. In the same year the latter was blackballed by the GAA for attending an Irish international soccer match.

A big running news story was the handing back of the final three 'Treaty Ports' still in British hands. With war looming the British possession of defences at Lough Swilly in Donegal, Berehaven in Castletownbere and Spike Island in Cork represented a serious threat to the fledgling state's neutrality.

Spike Island, outside Cobh, was handed over in July, Berehaven in September and the international press made a big story of the final ceremony at Drumree fort, Lough Swilly in October where Sergeant O'Flynn of the Royal Artillery lowered the Union Jack and his brother-in-law Sergeant McLoughlin of the Free State coastal artillery defence unit stepped in to raise the Tricolour.

The inter linking sitting room
The inter linking sitting room

Also in the news was the end of the six-year long Economic War with Britain. De Valera had brought it on by terminating land reparations to Britain promised upon independence. The protectionist tit-for-tat trade penalties which followed saw Ireland hit by prohibitive 20pc taxes on produce shipped to Britain - a market which accounted for 90pc of our exports.

De Valera used the Economic War to drive Ireland towards inward looking self sufficiency with Government urging us to buy Irish. The rallying call of the day was to "burn everything British but their coal."

Ironically this regressive protectionist policy was devised and managed by Agriculture Minister Sean Lemass, who would come to be remembered for opening up the economy as Taoiseach in the 1960's.

The Economic War caused the decimation of both industry and farming and a relative famine in the construction of new homes in the cities. In the "hungry thirties" spending power was curtailed and few had the money to buy a house.

The interlinking reception rooms - living room and sitting room
The interlinking reception rooms - living room and sitting room

But some schemes did go ahead. Among the few constructed in Dublin that year were the first homes at Collins Avenue, Dublin 9. These were developed along the line of an old country grasstrack known as Puckstown Lane.

The house at 192 Collins Avenue in Beaumont, Dublin 9 which has just been placed on the market, was one of those early Collins Avenue homes which reflected older craft values.

They were among the last of the traditional red-brick period styles which began in the Victorian era and continued to the Second World War, after which we turned to render frontages and plainer "box" designs.

1930's built houses were also expertly crafted and joined in an era of careful and exacting apprenticeships for tradesmen. And in recession when work was scarce, finish tended to be of an even higher quality. Brick laying was solid and concise in a time with the renowned firms of Stringer and Strain setting the standard in Dublin.

The bespoke kitchen and breakfast room with an island breakfast bar unit
The bespoke kitchen and breakfast room with an island breakfast bar unit

No192 comes with characteristic bright red brick frontage, recessed arch porch and double height bay window columns.

While compact by period early 20th Century red-brick standards, the accommodation at No192 is substantial by modern tallies at almost 1,700 sq ft. Recently the property has been restored and upgraded inside in a 'chalked' Scandinavian style with pale tones reflecting light throughout. The head to toe refurb has made this a thoroughly modern home in a period crafted setting. The windows are wood framed with double glaze and the BER is B2 - unusually high even for a restoration which includes high quality insulation.

Accommodation includes interlinking receptions with a sitting room running into the living room, both of which contain matching art deco style white painted timber fireplace surrounds with slate hearths. The carpets in both rooms are a light cream/biscuit.

There's a study and playroom and a key feature is the bespoke kitchen and breakfast room. This has marble topped surfaces and includes an island breakfast bar counter unit. There's a stainless steel Smeg cooker and integrated fridge and freezer as well as a dishwasher.

The back garden with an Indian sandstone patio
The back garden with an Indian sandstone patio

Upstairs, the master bedroom, one of three has its own en-suite as well as a walk-in dressingroom with his and her fitted wardrobes and shelving.

The main bathroom comes with a Triton cubicle shower unit. The front garden is gravelled for the most part with landscaped siding and foreground planting area, sown with hydrangeas. There's also a gated side entrance for cars. The rear garden comes with an Indian sandstone patio.

This house is handy for the airport, Dublin City University and Beaumont hospital. Gallagher Quigley seeks €550,000.

The master bedroom
The master bedroom

192 Collins Ave

Beaumont, Dublin 9

Asking price: €550,000

Agent: Gallagher Quigley (01) 8183000

Indo Property

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