Thursday 29 September 2016

'Cruise line chic' home in Stillorgan can be yours for €1.095m

A house at Stillorgan Park Avenue is characterised by aspects of the maritime influenced Moderne style

Published 21/08/2015 | 02:30

Belts of marine style glazing panels were typical of Irish estate homes developed in the 1930s, such as Avalon in Blackrock
Belts of marine style glazing panels were typical of Irish estate homes developed in the 1930s, such as Avalon in Blackrock
The study area at Avalon
The hall at Avalon
The kitchen and breakfast room overlooks the deck outside.
The main living room in Avalon
One of the double bedrooms in Avalon

Throughout the 1930s the world became obsessed with cruise line chic. With leisure on the sea opening up to the masses for the first time, the German Bremen, the French Normandie and the British Queen Mary became svelte floating embodiments of technology, progress and glamour.

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The shining liners steamed through the day's front page headlines for successive record speeds of passage and saturated the social columns with news of the screen stars and society idols who partied aboard.

As the cruise lines tried to outdo one another by employing bigger architects and more cutting edge interior gurus, maritime design began breaking out into the mainstream and also permeated into housebuilding. From the cruise ships came the Streamline Moderne style.

The high tide mark of the cruise era also saw Irish builders beginning to construct large suburban estates for the first time which were aimed at the private market.

In keeping with the style of the day they permitted their architects to dip into Moderne's elongated lines, curved edges, chromed rails and nautical touches - some even sticking in the occasional porthole window into the resulting homes.

The properties that resulted in the brave new estates of Mount Merrion, Terenure and Stillorgan looked nothing like their predecessors and must have seemed almost other worldly to the buyers of the day.

More recently, 1930s design qualities are enjoying a new appreciation from buyers who have increasingly embarked on restoration projects to return these houses as faithfully as possible to their original looks, right down to sourcing the exact powder-pastel paint hues for the front doors.

A great example of a home from this era is Avalon at 7 Stillorgan Park Avenue in South County Dublin where 1930s design features include the elongated panels of clustered tall narrow liner-style windows and indeed the overall 'stacked decks' look of the bright coloured frontage.

Inside we see a high mounted hall dado - a nod to the grab rails that featured in the corridors of ships. There's the distinctive swept and blended joins between wall and ceiling, inspired by maritime guest cabins. These homes would also have come with thin planked deck-style floors in contrast to their broad-boarded predecessors.

Another advantage to a 1930s family home is the ultra large garden provided as standard at a time when sun lounging and outdoor pursuits like lawn tennis had become popular, when home-food growing was still commonplace and when land prices remained relatively cheap.

One of the double bedrooms in Avalon
One of the double bedrooms in Avalon
Belts of marine style glazing panels were typical of Irish estate homes developed in the 1930s, such as Avalon in Blackrock
The study area at Avalon
The hall at Avalon
The kitchen and breakfast room overlooks the deck outside.
The main living room in Avalon

Today it means No.7 comes with a bonus benefit for the next owner. The current incumbents have previously secured outline permission for a second dwelling to the side of the current one - an obvious investment advantage and a factor which could bring a small builder into the bidding for this property.

Situated near the end of Stillorgan Park Avenue, the house comes with a good sized timber-floored entrance hall to set its tone with a guest WC located off it. There are four reception rooms in all, making the house ideal for a big family with teenagers.

The living room faces the front of the house with tongue and groove timber floor (three of the receptions have this), and a gas fire.

The dining room also faces the front of the house and a door leads through to the family room which has French doors leading to the back garden. Also on the ground floor is a study.

The kitchen is kitted with Neff appliances and a bright red and black colour scheme dominates (the owner has splashed plenty of red about this house), while there's a five-point gas hob, a double oven and a whirlpool fridge and freezer.

Upstairs there are four bedrooms and the main bedroom comes with its own ensuite with a bath as well as a vaulted ceiling. Two more of the bedrooms are double sized and the family bathroom is kitted out with a power shower.

Finally, there's a decent sized converted attic space which is accessed via a spiral staircase from the landing below. This comes with under-eaves storage and fitted presses. The room would make a decent second office or a teenager's den and is lit above by two Veluxes.

Duplicitously, the An Post address checker lists this home's full address as "Stillorgan, Blackrock, Co Dublin" so either or both are correct. And you're not far from Dun Laoghaire where the Queen Mary II occasionally comes calling and where the port is currently serenading more liner dockings.

Meantime, Douglas Newman Good is cruising for offers on Avalon in the order of €1.095m.

Avalon, 7 Stillorgan Park Avenue, Blackrock, Co Dublin

Asking price: €1.095m

Agent: DNG Stillorgan Tel: 01 2832700

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