Life Gardens

Thursday 2 October 2014

Phlox are true summer delight for our borders

Gardening

Gerry Daly

Published 03/08/2014 | 02:30

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IMPACT: Phlox flowers add colour and are good survivors
IMPACT: Phlox flowers add colour and are good survivors

FEW plants flower as generously as the summer-flowering border phlox. It is a great plant for creating a summery look with masses of flowers, mostly in light colours, and it billows on the slightest breeze, emitting wafts of a light, sweet perfume. It is a true mainstay of the summer border.

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Few plants flower as generously as the summer-flowering border phlox. It is a great plant for creating a summery look with masses of flowers,

Easy to grow, it can be grown in any garden and, though it can make a waist-high clump of a metre or so across, it is small enough to fit comfortably into a small garden, where even a single plant will make great impact, or it can be used to fill more space in a larger garden.

It is particularly successful when used in repeat planting along a medium or large border, the colour of one phlox plant, or group, picked up by the next, carrying the eye onward, and creating a gentle unity as well as a powerful colour effect.

The two main species grown as ornamental plants here are meadow plants native to North America, thriving there in deep, moist soil in full sun or light shade.

Like most meadow plants, the flowers are carried at the very top of the stems, where they will get the attention of pollinating insects. This makes them ideal for flower borders where they can show off their flowers to best advantage.

The colours are mostly tints of light pinks, lilac and white with some two-tones and some dark purples and reds.

They associate well with other flowers and extremely well with each other, but some moving around of the plant might be needed to get the flowering position right, and it moves very easily in autumn.

The flowers have been magnificent in most gardens this year, growing really well from spring but have been challenged in some places by drought.

These phlox like well-drained soil that is moisture-retentive, and they tend to flag in dry, warm weather. On light soil and in places that do not get much rain, the blossoms can wilt.

However, a good soak or a day’s heavy rain usually sees things back to normal. Phlox are very reliable year after year and lasts well in gardens. Very old plants can sometimes be seen surviving in abandoned gardens where clearly the survival habits honed in the American meadows stand it in good stead.

Being a good survivor is a sign that phlox are largely trouble-free and do not suffer greatly from pests or diseases, just give it the right growing conditions.

 

IMPACT: Phlox flowers add colour and are good survivors

 

Phlox are true summer delight for our borders

 

Few plants flower as generously as the summer-flowering border phlox. It is a great plant for creating a summery look with masses of flowers, mostly in light colours, and it billows on the slightest breeze, emitting wafts of a light, sweet perfume. It is a true mainstay of the summer border.

Easy to grow, it can be grown in any garden and, though it can make a waist-high clump of a metre or so across, it is small enough to fit comfortably into a small garden, where even a single plant will make great impact, or it can be used to fill more space in a larger garden.

It is particularly successful when used in repeat planting along a medium or large border, the colour of one phlox plant, or group, picked up by the next, carrying the eye onward, and creating a gentle unity as well as a powerful colour effect.

The two main species grown as ornamental plants here are meadow plants native to North America, thriving there in deep, moist soil in full sun or light shade.

Like most meadow plants, the flowers are carried at the very top of the stems, where they will get the attention of pollinating insects. This makes them ideal for flower borders where they can show off their flowers to best advantage.

The colours are mostly tints of light pinks, lilac and white with some two-tones and some dark purples and reds.

They associate well with other flowers and extremely well with each other, but some moving around of the plant might be needed to get the flowering position right, and it moves very easily in autumn.

The flowers have been magnificent in most gardens this year, growing really well from spring but have been challenged in some places by drought.

These phlox like well-drained soil that is moisture-retentive, and they tend to flag in dry, warm weather. On light soil and in places that do not get much rain, the blossoms can wilt.

However, a good soak or a day’s heavy rain usually sees things back to normal. Phlox are very reliable year after year and lasts well in gardens. Very old plants can sometimes be seen surviving in abandoned gardens where clearly the survival habits honed in the American meadows stand it in good stead.

Being a good survivor is a sign that phlox are largely trouble-free and do not suffer greatly from pests or diseases, just give it the right growing conditions.Phlox are true summer delight for our borders

 

Few plants flower as generously as the summer-flowering border phlox. It is a great plant for creating a summery look with masses of flowers, mostly in light colours, and it billows on the slightest breeze, emitting wafts of a light, sweet perfume. It is a true mainstay of the summer border.

Easy to grow, it can be grown in any garden and, though it can make a waist-high clump of a metre or so across, it is small enough to fit comfortably into a small garden, where even a single plant will make great impact, or it can be used to fill more space in a larger garden.

It is particularly successful when used in repeat planting along a medium or large border, the colour of one phlox plant, or group, picked up by the next, carrying the eye onward, and creating a gentle unity as well as a powerful colour effect.

The two main species grown as ornamental plants here are meadow plants native to North America, thriving there in deep, moist soil in full sun or light shade.

Like most meadow plants, the flowers are carried at the very top of the stems, where they will get the attention of pollinating insects. This makes them ideal for flower borders where they can show off their flowers to best advantage.

The colours are mostly tints of light pinks, lilac and white with some two-tones and some dark purples and reds.

They associate well with other flowers and extremely well with each other, but some moving around of the plant might be needed to get the flowering position right, and it moves very easily in autumn.

The flowers have been magnificent in most gardens this year, growing really well from spring but have been challenged in some places by drought.

These phlox like well-drained soil that is moisture-retentive, and they tend to flag in dry, warm weather. On light soil and in places that do not get much rain, the blossoms can wilt.

However, a good soak or a day’s heavy rain usually sees things back to normal. Phlox are very reliable year after year and lasts well in gardens. Very old plants can sometimes be seen surviving in abandoned gardens where clearly the survival habits honed in the American meadows stand it in good stead.

Being a good survivor is a sign that phlox are largely trouble-free and do not suffer greatly from pests or diseases, just give it the right growing conditions.

 

IMPACT: Phlox flowers add colour and are good survivors

 

Few plants flower as generously as the summer-flowering border phlox. It is a great plant for creating a summery look with masses of flowers, mostly in light colours, and it billows on the slightest breeze, emitting wafts of a light, sweet perfume. It is a true mainstay of the summer border.

Easy to grow, it can be grown in any garden and, though it can make a waist-high clump of a metre or so across, it is small enough to fit comfortably into a small garden, where even a single plant will make great impact, or it can be used to fill more space in a larger garden.

It is particularly successful when used in repeat planting along a medium or large border, the colour of one phlox plant, or group, picked up by the next, carrying the eye onward, and creating a gentle unity as well as a powerful colour effect.

The two main species grown as ornamental plants here are meadow plants native to North America, thriving there in deep, moist soil in full sun or light shade.

Like most meadow plants, the flowers are carried at the very top of the stems, where they will get the attention of pollinating insects. This makes them ideal for flower borders where they can show off their flowers to best advantage.

The colours are mostly tints of light pinks, lilac and white with some two-tones and some dark purples and reds.

They associate well with other flowers and extremely well with each other, but some moving around of the plant might be needed to get the flowering position right, and it moves very easily in autumn.

The flowers have been magnificent in most gardens this year, growing really well from spring but have been challenged in some places by drought.

These phlox like well-drained soil that is moisture-retentive, and they tend to flag in dry, warm weather. On light soil and in places that do not get much rain, the blossoms can wilt.

However, a good soak or a day’s heavy rain usually sees things back to normal. Phlox are very reliable year after year and lasts well in gardens. Very old plants can sometimes be seen surviving in abandoned gardens where clearly the survival habits honed in the American meadows stand it in good stead.

Being a good survivor is a sign that phlox are largely trouble-free and do not suffer greatly from pests or diseases, just give it the right growing conditions.

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