Life Health & Wellbeing

Monday 24 October 2016

Summer recipes... Slim but don't suffer

Published 31/05/2015 | 02:30

Beef fillet with Stilton polenta mash
Beef fillet with Stilton polenta mash
Chicken caesar with pear and walnuts

Try these tasty seasonal recipes for lunch or dinner and enjoy the fact that slimming doesn't have to mean suffering

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Beef fillet with Stilton polenta mash

12 ProPoints  per serving

24 ProPoints per recipe

15 minutes in total

Serves 2


2 X 125g (4oz) lean beef fillet steaks

1/2 garlic clove, crushed

1 tsp dried oregano

Calorie controlled cooking spray

400ml (14 fl oz) hot vegetable stock

100g (3 oz) dried quick-cook one-minute polenta

40g (1oz) Stilton cheese, crumbled

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. On a clean board between two sheets of cling film, bash each fillet steak with a rolling pin until lightly flattened and about 1 cm thick. Put the steaks in a shallow bowl and toss with the garlic, oregano and seasoning.

2. Heat a griddle pan or non stick frying pan. Spray the steaks with the cooking spray and then cook in the griddle pan for about 1-2 minutes on each side or until cooked to your liking. Remove from the heat then leave to rest, covered, for 5 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, put the stock in a large saucepan and bring to the boil. Add polenta and stir continuously for 1 minute until thickened and cooked. Divide the polenta between two plates and top each with half the Stilton and a steak. Serve immediately.

Chicken Caesar with pear & walnuts

8 ProPoints per serving

Serves 1


50g wholemeal bread cut into cubes

30g 0% fat natural yoghurt

1 tsp wholegrain or Dijon mustard

Black pepper

50g cos lettuce

A handful of watercress

1 small chopped apple or pear

Lemon juice

60g shredded cooked skinless chicken

10g grated Parmesan

5g walnuts

1. Dry fry the bread cubes for 3-5 mins, turning regularly until toasted, then set aside. Combine the natural yoghurt and mustard with some black pepper.

2. Arrange the cos lettuce and a handful of watercress in a serving bowl. Scatter with 1 small chopped apple or pear that has been tossed with a little lemon juice and top with the chicken breast, the croutons and the grated Parmesan. Sprinkle the walnuts on top and drizzle the dressing over.


4 ProPoints per serving

22 ProPoints per recipe

20 minutes plus cooling

Serves 6


Calorie-controlled cooking spray

1 onion, chopped

1 large courgette, sliced

300g (10 1/2oz) cooked new potatoes, chopped into chunks

75g (2 1/2oz) petits pois or garden peas

2 handfuls of baby spinach leaves

6 eggs

3 tbsp skimmed milk

50g mature Cheddar cheese, grated

Freshly ground black pepper

Salad leaves, to garnish

1. Preheat the grill. Heat a non-stick frying pan measuring about 30cm (12 inches) in diameter and spray with the cooking spray. Add the onion, courgette and potatoes and cook on the hob for 4-5 minutes, stirring often. Add the peas and spinach and cook for 2-3 more minutes to wilt the spinach leaves.

2. Beat the eggs and milk together, season with black pepper, then pour into the frying pan. Cook over a medium-low heat for 4-5 minutes to set the base, then sprinkle the cheese on top. Transfer to the grill to set the surface for about 4-5 minutes. Remove from the heat and cool for 5-10 minutes, so that the frittata will be easier to slice.

3. Cut the frittata into 6 and serve, garnished with salad leaves.

Salad secrets

Bagged salad leaves are high on the list when it comes to food wastage. Pop a folded paper towel in the bag before you re-seal it to absorb excess moisture and keep the leftover salad fresh for longer.

Try these other tips:

Keep as much of your cucumber as you can covered in its plastic cover. Shrink wrapped cucumber will stay fresh up to three times longer than the unwrapped version.

Wrapping celery in aluminium foil and storing it in the fridge will keep it crisp for at least two weeks. Foil works with celery because it preserves the vegetable's moisture, but because it's not an airtight seal like cling film, it allows any ethylene (the gas that causes fruit and veg to ripen) to escape.

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