Friday 30 September 2016

Facebook ‘creeping’ on your ex is bad for your mental health reveals study

Published 14/06/2016 | 13:52

Keeping up to date on your ex’s life on social media could negatively impact your mental wellbeing, a new study has found.
Keeping up to date on your ex’s life on social media could negatively impact your mental wellbeing, a new study has found.

Keeping up to date on your ex’s life on social media could negatively impact your mental wellbeing, a new study has found.

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The research, published in the journal of Cyberpsychology, Behaviour and Social Networking, found that remained friends with an ex-lover on Facebook can be self-destructive.

Psychologist Tara Marshall, who led the study, found that ‘surveillance’ of an ex can cause distress in those who choose not to cut ties.

"Participants who remained Facebook friends with the ex-partner, relative to those who did not remain Facebook friends, reported less negative feelings, sexual desire, and longing for the former partner, but lower personal growth,"

"Overall, these findings suggest that exposure to an ex-partner through Facebook may obstruct the process of healing and moving on from a past relationship."

Read more: Top tips for getting over your ex

Meanwhile, a recent study found that people who can maintain friendships with their exes after a break-up are more likely to be manipulative, narcissistic and psychopathic than those who do not communicate with old lovers.

The research found that those who enjoyed a friendship with their ex said they stayed in touch because they were trustworthy and there was a strong sentimental attachment between the pair.

Read more: Broken hearts are a real thing as break ups take their toll on your ticker

The study, conducted by researchers at Oakland University, revealed that those with darker personality traits are more likely to maintain friendships with their former lovers for the chance to trade valuable resources such as information, money and sex.

In the report, published in the journal Personality and Individual Differences authors Justin Mogilski and Dr Lisa Welling write:  “Although a break-up nominally marks the end of a romantic relationship, the current research suggests that resource exchange between ex-partners can extend beyond relationship dissolution.

“Across two studies, we identified reasons for remaining friends after a break-up and outlined how the importance of these reasons varies with sex and personality.

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