Tuesday 27 September 2016

Two thirds of Irish workers are ‘break-shamed’ and are unclear about the amount break time they are entitled to

Published 01/04/2015 | 12:58

The research found that 70pc of workers are unclear about how much time they should spend away from their desk
The research found that 70pc of workers are unclear about how much time they should spend away from their desk
An employee who works a typical eight hour day is entitled to a 15 minute break as well as an hour for lunch, according to a survey by Lyons Tea.

If you’re sitting at your desk scoffing a sandwich with your boss’ beady eye upon you, new research has found that you’re definitely not the only one.

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More than two thirds of Irish people aren’t sure how much break time they are legally entitled to throughout their working day, a new study has revealed.

The research found that 70pc of workers are unclear about how much time they should spend away from their desk at lunch-time and other points during the day.

Half of the workforce admitted that they never slip away from their desk for a quick cup of tea and 70pc dished that they don’t have time to even put the kettle on.

Shockingly, the study conducted by Lyons Tea found that 20pc of Irish employees believe mid-morning breaks or ‘elevenses’ are deeply frowned upon by bosses

In Ireland, an employee who works a typical eight hour day is entitled to a 15 minute break as well as an hour for lunch.

An employee who works a typical eight hour day is entitled to a 15 minute break as well as an hour for lunch, according to a survey by Lyons Tea.
An employee who works a typical eight hour day is entitled to a 15 minute break as well as an hour for lunch, according to a survey by Lyons Tea.
The research found that 70pc of workers are unclear about how much time they should spend away from their desk

Despite a reluctance to take appropriate breaks for fear of appearing lazy or unambitious, 66pc of Irish workers believe their happiness level would increase if they took more breaks.

Sunday Independent columnist and Operation Transformation GP Dr Ciara Kelly said: “Punctuating our day with small breaks where we can reflect on something other than work is important for mental well-being. Contrary to what you ay think, taking breaks will actually increase your productivity.

“Rushing from task to task without a break or reflection can add to stress levels and undermine our mental health. It’s common now for people to not take breaks, to skip lunch or eat at their desks, but it’s not good for your overall health or quality of life.”

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