Life Health Features

Wednesday 18 January 2017

Starbucks favourite contains a whopping 25 spoons of sugar

Published 17/02/2016 | 10:12

Coffee run favourites can contain “dangerously high” levels of sugar in a single cup, according to a new study which focused on the detrimental effect of daily sweet beverages on our health.
Coffee run favourites can contain “dangerously high” levels of sugar in a single cup, according to a new study which focused on the detrimental effect of daily sweet beverages on our health.

Coffee run favourites can contain “dangerously high” levels of sugar in a single cup, according to a new study which focused on the detrimental effect of daily sweet beverages on our health.

  • Go To

The UK study, conducted by Action on Sugar, exposed Starbucks as being a main offender with one beverage on offer containing more than 25 teaspoons of sugar.

The research analysed flavoured coffees such as mochas, hot chocolates, frappes and lattes in high-street cafes and found that a third of the beverages contain more sugar than Coca Cola, which contains 9 teaspoons of sugar per can.

Following the analysis of 131 sweet offerings on the high-street, the research found that 98pc of flavoured coffees would be given a red nutritional value for high sugar content.

Starbucks’ Mulled Fruit offering with grape chai, orange and cinnamon was found to be the most cavity inducing, containing 25 teaspoons of sugar, while Costa’s Chai Latte has 20 teaspoons of sugar per cup.

Starbucks’ venti White Chocolate Mocha was found to have 18 teaspoons of sugar, and also is topped with whipped cream.

Professor Graham MacGregor, chair of Action on Sugar, said: "This is yet again another example of scandalous amount of sugar added to our food and drink.

Action on Sugar researcher Kawther Hashem added: "Coffee shop chains must immediately reduce the amount of sugar in these hot drinks, improve their labelling and stop selling the extra-large serving sizes.

"These hot flavoured drinks should be an occasional treat, not an 'everyday' drink. They are laden with an unbelievable amount of sugar and calories and are often accompanied by a high sugar and fat snack.

"Our advice to consumers is to have a plain hot drink or ask for your drink to contain a minimal amount of syrup, preferably sugar free, in the smallest serving size available."

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Life