Tuesday 25 July 2017

Older siblings are 40pc more likely to be heavier than their younger sisters research finds

A recent study found that older sisters are more likely to be heavier than their younger sisters
A recent study found that older sisters are more likely to be heavier than their younger sisters
Patricia Murphy

Patricia Murphy

If you’re feeling a little bit tubbier than your younger siblings, fear not, as new research has confirmed that you’re not alone.

A recent study found that older sisters are 40pc more likely to be obese than their younger sisters and 29pc more likely to be overweight.

The research, which involved the study of more than 13,400 pairs of sisters in Sweden, analysed the weight of women between 1991 and 2009.

The sisters were each weighed while they were between 10 and 12 weeks pregnant and researchers found that older sisters were an average of 1lb 4oz heavier than their younger siblings. This meant that their body mass index (BMI) was 2.4pc higher.

The study continued the regular assessment of the siblings over an 18 year period and found their weight increased up to 4oz year on year.

Researchers at the University of Auckland in New Zealand and Uppsala University in Sweden revealed that they were unclear as to why older sisters were found to be heavier on average.

Meanwhile, the scientists behind the research revealed that the findings could signify that older siblings are more likely to suffer from high blood pressure and diabetes than their younger siblings.

The study’s lead researchers said: “Our study corroborates other large studies on men, as we showed firstborn women have greater BMI and are more likely to be overweight or obese than their second-born sisters.

“The steady reduction in family size may be a contributing factor to the observed increase in adult BMI worldwide, not only among men, but also among women.”

Past research has also suggested that similar findings can relate to men as older brothers were found to be heavier than their younger brothers on average.

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