Sunday 26 March 2017

Dubs mascot Molly McNally to miss US clinical trial over fears of relapse

Kevin O Brien,Ciaran Kilkenny,Brian Fenton and Philly Ryan from the Dublin Senior GAA Football panel were on hand to share their footballing tips with budding local Docklands GAA fans and players and one very special little Dubs fan, Molly McNally (centre) at a charity meet and greet at the Gibson hotel
Kevin O Brien,Ciaran Kilkenny,Brian Fenton and Philly Ryan from the Dublin Senior GAA Football panel were on hand to share their footballing tips with budding local Docklands GAA fans and players and one very special little Dubs fan, Molly McNally (centre) at a charity meet and greet at the Gibson hotel
Fiona Dillon

Fiona Dillon

Little Molly McNally, who has successfully battled a rare form of cancer, will not be travelling to the US as planned to take part in a clinical trial.

Dubs mascot Molly (7), from Balbriggan, was diagnosed with Neuroblastoma when she was five, but is now in remission.

Her parents, Gerry (47) and Emma (44), yesterday outlined their future plans.

"It was the intention to enrol Molly on a clinical trial to prevent relapse in the US once she got to remission and finished frontline treatment in Crumlin," they said.

Brave Molly McNally is in remission
Brave Molly McNally is in remission

chemotherapy

"As we progressed with Molly's treatment here, her disease became more and more difficult to manage and Molly went off her original protocol and enrolled on a clinical trial in Crumlin.

"This required five extra months of chemotherapy, in the hope that it would reduce the amount of disease.

"During this time, Molly was scanned more frequently to monitor her progress. The day before each scan, Molly would be injected with a radioactive dye.

"During her treatment, she received 11 of these scans which is more than double the required amount on the standard protocol for stage four high-risk Neuroblastoma.

"If Molly was to enrol on the trial in the US she would be obliged to have a further seven of these scans over a two-year period.

"Considering Molly is now cancer-free, the lasting effects of these scans could be detrimental to her future health."

Molly's parents added that there was an ongoing risk of developing cancer from all of the scans, and on the advice of her consultant oncologist they had decided not to enrol Molly on the trial.

Stressful

"It has been a very stressful time for us, but after several meetings with the medical team in Crumlin and listening and understanding fully the possible effects these scans could have, we are 100pc certain that this is the best decision for our little girl," the couple said.

"Our fundraising campaign to date stands at €243,501.51. Molly's Trust will stay as is in AIB Balbriggan.

"The funds will be available for Molly if in the future further treatment is required."

Herald

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