Thursday 29 September 2016

Don't ignore deep vein thrombosis

Published 03/05/2016 | 02:30

If you think you are at risk of deep vein thrombosis then you should see your doctor before travel.
If you think you are at risk of deep vein thrombosis then you should see your doctor before travel.

The summer holidays are beckoning and for those with risk factors for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) it's worth preparing in advance.

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People at risk inlcude those who have:

* a history of DVT or pulmonary embolism

* cancer

* stroke

* heart disease

* inherited tendency to clot (thrombophilia)

* recent surgery (pelvic region or legs)

* obesity

* pregnancy

* hormone replacement therapy

If you think you have a risk of developing DVT, see your GP before you travel. Don't leave it until the last minute in case you need to buy medication, compression stockings or anything else for your flight.

DVT occurs when blood flows too slowly through the veins. The blood forms a clot that blocks up deep veins, usually in the legs.

DVT doesn't generally have any immediate symptoms, making it difficult to spot. However, typical signs include a swollen or painful calf or thigh, paleness and increased heat around the affected area.

If left untreated, people with DVT are at risk of developing a pulmonary embolism, when part of the blood clot breaks away and travels to the lung, which can be fatal.

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