Wednesday 7 December 2016

Gallery: Fascinating photographs captured from space show the world from an astronaut’s point of view

Published 23/07/2015 | 10:44

Grand Prismatic Spring: At the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park, visitors can get a close-up view on a series of elevated boardwalks. The hot spring gets its vivid colour from pigmented bacteria that grow around the edge of the mineral-rich water.
Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Grand Prismatic Spring: At the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park, visitors can get a close-up view on a series of elevated boardwalks. The hot spring gets its vivid colour from pigmented bacteria that grow around the edge of the mineral-rich water. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Venice: Venice, Italy is situated upon 118 small islands that are separated by canals and linked by bridges. With tide waters expected to rise to perilous levels in the coming decades, the city has constructed 78 giant steel gates across the three inlets through which water from the Adriatic could surge into Venice's lagoon. The panels which weigh 300-tons and are 92ft wide and 65ft high are fixed to massive concrete bases dug into the seabed Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Arc de Triomphe: This Overview captures the Arc de Triomphe. The structure, which was commissioned in 1806 after Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz during the peak of his fortunes, is located at the center of twelve radiating avenues in Paris, France. Because of numerous delays, including the abdication of Napoleon, construction of the monument took nearly 30 years to complete. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Port of Hamburg: The Port of Hamburg, known as Germany's "Gateway to the World", is located on the Elbe River in Hamburg. On an average day, the facility is accessed by 28 ships, 200 freight trains, and 5,000 trucks. In total, the port moves 132.3 million tonnes of cargo each year. That's roughly 1/3 of the mass of all living human beings. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Niagara Falls: Niagara Falls is the collective name for three waterfalls that straddle the border between Ontario, Canada and the United States. Horseshoe Falls is shown here. The falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world, with a vertical drop of more than 165 feet (50 m). The Maid of the Mist boat, visible here, has carried passengers into the rapids immediately below the falls since 1846 Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Victorville: The Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, California, is a massive transitional hub for commercial aircraft. The facility's boneyard, pictured here, contains more than 150 retired planes Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Moab Potash Ponds: The Intrepid Potash Mine in Moab, Utah, USA produces muriate of potash, a potassium-containing salt used widely by farmers in fertilizer. The salt is pumped to the surface from underground deposits and dried in massive solar ponds that vibrantly extend across the landscape. As the water evaporates over the course of 300 days, the salts crystallize out. The water is dyed bright blue to reduce the amount of time it takes for the potash to crystallise; darker water absorbs more sunlight and heat Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Burning Man: Burning Man is a week-long, annual event held in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada, USA. Drawing more than 65,000 participants in 2014, the event is described as an experiment in community, art, radical self-expression, and radical self-reliance. The developed part of Black Rock City, the temporary residence of the campers, is arranged as a series of concentric streets with the 'Man Sculpture' and his supporting complex at the centre Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Granada Olive Plantation: An olive tree plantation covers the hills of Cordoba, Spain. Approximately 90% of all harvested olives are turned in to oil, while the 10% are eaten as table olives Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Bourtange: In this Overview, we see the star fort of Bourtange, Netherlands. This town was constructed in 1593 in this manner so that an attack on any of its five walls could be aggressively counteracted from the two adjacent star points A new Overview is published each day here: www.dailyoverview.com www.instagram.com/dailyoverview Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Great Pyramids of Giza: The Great Pyramids of Giza are located on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. Dating back to 2580 BC, the Great Pyramid, the largest structure at the site, is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient world and the only one to remain largely intact. With an estimated 2,300,000 stone blocks weighing from 2 to 30 tons each, the 481 foot pyramid was the tallest structure in the world for more than 3,800 years Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Gemasolar Solar Concentraor: This Overview captures the Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant in Seville, Spain. The solar concentrator use 2,650 heliostat mirrors to collect and focus the sun's thermal energy to heat molten salt flowing through a 460-foot tall central tower. The molten salt then circulates from the tower to a storage tank where it is used to produce steam and generate electricity. In total, the facility displaces approximately 30,000 tons of CO2 emissions every year Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Eixample, Barcelona: The Example District in Barcelona, Spain is characterised by its strict grid pattern, octagonal intersections, and apartments with communal courtyards Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Brasilia: Brasilia was founded on April 21, 1960 in order to move the capital from Rio de Janeiro to a more central location within Brazil. The design resembling an airplane from above was developed by L˙cio Costa and prominently features the modernist buildings of the celebrated architect Oscar Niemeyer at its centre Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Central Park: Central Park in New York City spans 843 acres. That's 6% of the island of Manhattan Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Amsterdam: The canal system of Amsterdam, known as 'Grachten', is the result of conscious urban planning. In the early 17th century, when immigration was at a peak, a comprehensive plan for the city's expansion was developed with four concentric half-circles of canals emerging at the main waterfront (seen at the top of this Overview). In the centuries since, the canals have been used for defense, water management, and transport. They remain a hallmark of the city to this day Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Netherlands Tulip Fields: This Overview captures the blooming tulip fields in Lisse, Netherlands. The flowers are in peak bloom in April of each year Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Huelva Orchard: Fruit trees swirl on the hills of Huelva, Spain. The climate there is ideal for growing growing with an average temperature of 64 degrees and a relative humidity between 60% and 80% Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Pilbara Mine: The Mount Whaleback Iron Ore Mine is located in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. 98% of mined iron ore is used to make steel and is thus a major component in the construction of buildings, automobiles, and appliances such as refrigerators Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Almeria Greenhouses: Greenhouses, also known as plasticulture, cover approximately 20,000 hectares of land (more than 75 square miles) in Almeria, Spain. The use of plastic covering is designed to increase produce yield, increase produce size and shorten growth time. For a sense of scale, this Overview shows roughly six square miles. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Stelvio Pass: The Stelvio Pass is a road in northern Italy that is the highest paved roadway in the Eastern Alps with an elevation of 2,757 m (9,045 ft) above sea level. Only accessible in the summer months (June-September), the road and its 75 hairpin turns are sometimes scaled during the famous Giro d'Italia cycling race Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Roseville Yard: Roseville Yard, located north of Sacramento, California is the largest rail facility on the west coast of the United States. Operated by the Union Pacific Railroad, the yard accommodates approximately 98 percent of all rail traffic in the north of the state Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Marrakesh: The medina quarter in Marrakesh, Morocco is characterized by its winding, maze-like streets. Because the intricately connected honeycomb of alleyways narrows to less than a meter wide (~ 3 feet) at certain spots, the area is generally free from car traffic Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Plaza Del Ejecutivo, Mexico City: Radiating streets surround the Plaza Del Ejecutivo in the Venustiano Carranza district of Mexico City, Mexico Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Spiral Jetty: Spiral Jetty is an earthwork sculpture by Robert Smithson, consisting of a 1,500-foot-long (460 m), 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) counterclockwise coil jutting from the northeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah, USA. Smithson reportedly chose this site because of the vibrant colors of the water (salt-tolerant bacteria and algae thrive here in 27% salinity) and its connection with the primordial sea. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Glastonbury: Glastonbury Festival is a five day music event attended by more than 135,000 people every year in Pilton, Somerset, England. The population of Pilton on the other 360 days of the year is 998. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Nardo Ring: The Nardo Ring is a high speed, 7.8 mile long, circular test track in Nardo, Italy. Each of the ring's four lanes has a determined 'neutral speed' and is banked in such a manner that one can drive as if the road were straight. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Het Loo Palace: Het Loo Palace is located in Apeldoorn, Netherlands. 'The Great Garden,' situated behind the residence, follows the general Baroque landscape design formula: perfect symmetry, axial layout with radiating gravel walks, parterres with fountains, basins, and statues Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock

A beautiful photo series which showcases some of the world’s most stunning landmarks captured from space has received worldwide admiration.

  • Go To

The collection which was created by New York-based creator Benjamin Grant captures the ‘overview effect’ which is the sensation astronauts experience when looking at the earth from a height.

The images were captured in collaboration with Digital Globe, a satellite imaging company which can snap photographs from miles above the earth.

Within the collection are photographs of Glastonbury, the Nardo Ring test track and a Californian plane boneyard.

“Nearly all of the Overviews focus on the places where human activity—for better or for worse—has shaped the landscape of the planet. Each one starts with a thought experiment,” said Benjamin.

“I consider the places where man has left his mark on the planet and then conduct the necessary research to identify locations (and the corresponding geo-coordinates) to convey that idea.

Moab Potash Ponds: The Intrepid Potash Mine in Moab, Utah, USA produces muriate of potash, a potassium-containing salt used widely by farmers in fertilizer. The salt is pumped to the surface from underground deposits and dried in massive solar ponds that vibrantly extend across the landscape. As the water evaporates over the course of 300 days, the salts crystallize out. The water is dyed bright blue to reduce the amount of time it takes for the potash to crystallise; darker water absorbs more sunlight and heat
Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Moab Potash Ponds: The Intrepid Potash Mine in Moab, Utah, USA produces muriate of potash, a potassium-containing salt used widely by farmers in fertilizer. The salt is pumped to the surface from underground deposits and dried in massive solar ponds that vibrantly extend across the landscape. As the water evaporates over the course of 300 days, the salts crystallize out. The water is dyed bright blue to reduce the amount of time it takes for the potash to crystallise; darker water absorbs more sunlight and heat Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Grand Prismatic Spring: At the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park, visitors can get a close-up view on a series of elevated boardwalks. The hot spring gets its vivid colour from pigmented bacteria that grow around the edge of the mineral-rich water. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Venice: Venice, Italy is situated upon 118 small islands that are separated by canals and linked by bridges. With tide waters expected to rise to perilous levels in the coming decades, the city has constructed 78 giant steel gates across the three inlets through which water from the Adriatic could surge into Venice's lagoon. The panels which weigh 300-tons and are 92ft wide and 65ft high are fixed to massive concrete bases dug into the seabed Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Arc de Triomphe: This Overview captures the Arc de Triomphe. The structure, which was commissioned in 1806 after Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz during the peak of his fortunes, is located at the center of twelve radiating avenues in Paris, France. Because of numerous delays, including the abdication of Napoleon, construction of the monument took nearly 30 years to complete. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Port of Hamburg: The Port of Hamburg, known as Germany's "Gateway to the World", is located on the Elbe River in Hamburg. On an average day, the facility is accessed by 28 ships, 200 freight trains, and 5,000 trucks. In total, the port moves 132.3 million tonnes of cargo each year. That's roughly 1/3 of the mass of all living human beings. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Niagara Falls: Niagara Falls is the collective name for three waterfalls that straddle the border between Ontario, Canada and the United States. Horseshoe Falls is shown here. The falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world, with a vertical drop of more than 165 feet (50 m). The Maid of the Mist boat, visible here, has carried passengers into the rapids immediately below the falls since 1846 Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Victorville: The Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, California, is a massive transitional hub for commercial aircraft. The facility's boneyard, pictured here, contains more than 150 retired planes Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Burning Man: Burning Man is a week-long, annual event held in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada, USA. Drawing more than 65,000 participants in 2014, the event is described as an experiment in community, art, radical self-expression, and radical self-reliance. The developed part of Black Rock City, the temporary residence of the campers, is arranged as a series of concentric streets with the 'Man Sculpture' and his supporting complex at the centre Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Granada Olive Plantation: An olive tree plantation covers the hills of Cordoba, Spain. Approximately 90% of all harvested olives are turned in to oil, while the 10% are eaten as table olives Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Bourtange: In this Overview, we see the star fort of Bourtange, Netherlands. This town was constructed in 1593 in this manner so that an attack on any of its five walls could be aggressively counteracted from the two adjacent star points A new Overview is published each day here: www.dailyoverview.com www.instagram.com/dailyoverview Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Great Pyramids of Giza: The Great Pyramids of Giza are located on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. Dating back to 2580 BC, the Great Pyramid, the largest structure at the site, is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient world and the only one to remain largely intact. With an estimated 2,300,000 stone blocks weighing from 2 to 30 tons each, the 481 foot pyramid was the tallest structure in the world for more than 3,800 years Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Gemasolar Solar Concentraor: This Overview captures the Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant in Seville, Spain. The solar concentrator use 2,650 heliostat mirrors to collect and focus the sun's thermal energy to heat molten salt flowing through a 460-foot tall central tower. The molten salt then circulates from the tower to a storage tank where it is used to produce steam and generate electricity. In total, the facility displaces approximately 30,000 tons of CO2 emissions every year Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Eixample, Barcelona: The Example District in Barcelona, Spain is characterised by its strict grid pattern, octagonal intersections, and apartments with communal courtyards Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Brasilia: Brasilia was founded on April 21, 1960 in order to move the capital from Rio de Janeiro to a more central location within Brazil. The design resembling an airplane from above was developed by L˙cio Costa and prominently features the modernist buildings of the celebrated architect Oscar Niemeyer at its centre Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Central Park: Central Park in New York City spans 843 acres. That's 6% of the island of Manhattan Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Amsterdam: The canal system of Amsterdam, known as 'Grachten', is the result of conscious urban planning. In the early 17th century, when immigration was at a peak, a comprehensive plan for the city's expansion was developed with four concentric half-circles of canals emerging at the main waterfront (seen at the top of this Overview). In the centuries since, the canals have been used for defense, water management, and transport. They remain a hallmark of the city to this day Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Netherlands Tulip Fields: This Overview captures the blooming tulip fields in Lisse, Netherlands. The flowers are in peak bloom in April of each year Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Huelva Orchard: Fruit trees swirl on the hills of Huelva, Spain. The climate there is ideal for growing growing with an average temperature of 64 degrees and a relative humidity between 60% and 80% Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Pilbara Mine: The Mount Whaleback Iron Ore Mine is located in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. 98% of mined iron ore is used to make steel and is thus a major component in the construction of buildings, automobiles, and appliances such as refrigerators Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Almeria Greenhouses: Greenhouses, also known as plasticulture, cover approximately 20,000 hectares of land (more than 75 square miles) in Almeria, Spain. The use of plastic covering is designed to increase produce yield, increase produce size and shorten growth time. For a sense of scale, this Overview shows roughly six square miles. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Stelvio Pass: The Stelvio Pass is a road in northern Italy that is the highest paved roadway in the Eastern Alps with an elevation of 2,757 m (9,045 ft) above sea level. Only accessible in the summer months (June-September), the road and its 75 hairpin turns are sometimes scaled during the famous Giro d'Italia cycling race Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Roseville Yard: Roseville Yard, located north of Sacramento, California is the largest rail facility on the west coast of the United States. Operated by the Union Pacific Railroad, the yard accommodates approximately 98 percent of all rail traffic in the north of the state Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Marrakesh: The medina quarter in Marrakesh, Morocco is characterized by its winding, maze-like streets. Because the intricately connected honeycomb of alleyways narrows to less than a meter wide (~ 3 feet) at certain spots, the area is generally free from car traffic Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Plaza Del Ejecutivo, Mexico City: Radiating streets surround the Plaza Del Ejecutivo in the Venustiano Carranza district of Mexico City, Mexico Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Spiral Jetty: Spiral Jetty is an earthwork sculpture by Robert Smithson, consisting of a 1,500-foot-long (460 m), 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) counterclockwise coil jutting from the northeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah, USA. Smithson reportedly chose this site because of the vibrant colors of the water (salt-tolerant bacteria and algae thrive here in 27% salinity) and its connection with the primordial sea. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Glastonbury: Glastonbury Festival is a five day music event attended by more than 135,000 people every year in Pilton, Somerset, England. The population of Pilton on the other 360 days of the year is 998. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Nardo Ring: The Nardo Ring is a high speed, 7.8 mile long, circular test track in Nardo, Italy. Each of the ring's four lanes has a determined 'neutral speed' and is banked in such a manner that one can drive as if the road were straight. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Het Loo Palace: Het Loo Palace is located in Apeldoorn, Netherlands. 'The Great Garden,' situated behind the residence, follows the general Baroque landscape design formula: perfect symmetry, axial layout with radiating gravel walks, parterres with fountains, basins, and statues Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock

“A number of themes have now developed for example transportation, agriculture, energy, so I often use those buckets to help generate new ideas as I search for new places to capture.

“Our project was inspired, and derives its name, from an idea known as the Overview Effect. This term refers to the sensation astronauts have when given the opportunity to look down and view the Earth as a whole.”

“They have the chance to appreciate our home in its entirety, to reflect on its beauty and its fragility all at once. That's the cognitive shift that we hope to inspire,' Benjamin adds.

“From our line of sight on the earth's surface, it's impossible to fully appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things we've constructed, the sheer complexity of the systems we've developed, or the devastating impact that we've had on our planet.

“We believe that beholding these forces as they shape our Earth is necessary to make progress in understanding who we are as a species, and what is needed to sustain a safe and healthy planet.”

“As a result, the Overviews (what we call these images) focus on the the places and moments where human activity—for better or for worse—has shaped the landscape.”

Benjamin has amassed more than 40,000 followers on Instagram since launching the interesting photos on his website.

Spiral Jetty: Spiral Jetty is an earthwork sculpture by Robert Smithson, consisting of a 1,500-foot-long (460 m), 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) counterclockwise coil jutting from the northeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah, USA. Smithson reportedly chose this site because of the vibrant colors of the water (salt-tolerant bacteria and algae thrive here in 27% salinity) and its connection with the primordial sea.
Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Spiral Jetty: Spiral Jetty is an earthwork sculpture by Robert Smithson, consisting of a 1,500-foot-long (460 m), 15-foot-wide (4.6 m) counterclockwise coil jutting from the northeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah, USA. Smithson reportedly chose this site because of the vibrant colors of the water (salt-tolerant bacteria and algae thrive here in 27% salinity) and its connection with the primordial sea. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Grand Prismatic Spring: At the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park, visitors can get a close-up view on a series of elevated boardwalks. The hot spring gets its vivid colour from pigmented bacteria that grow around the edge of the mineral-rich water. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Venice: Venice, Italy is situated upon 118 small islands that are separated by canals and linked by bridges. With tide waters expected to rise to perilous levels in the coming decades, the city has constructed 78 giant steel gates across the three inlets through which water from the Adriatic could surge into Venice's lagoon. The panels which weigh 300-tons and are 92ft wide and 65ft high are fixed to massive concrete bases dug into the seabed Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Arc de Triomphe: This Overview captures the Arc de Triomphe. The structure, which was commissioned in 1806 after Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz during the peak of his fortunes, is located at the center of twelve radiating avenues in Paris, France. Because of numerous delays, including the abdication of Napoleon, construction of the monument took nearly 30 years to complete. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Port of Hamburg: The Port of Hamburg, known as Germany's "Gateway to the World", is located on the Elbe River in Hamburg. On an average day, the facility is accessed by 28 ships, 200 freight trains, and 5,000 trucks. In total, the port moves 132.3 million tonnes of cargo each year. That's roughly 1/3 of the mass of all living human beings. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Niagara Falls: Niagara Falls is the collective name for three waterfalls that straddle the border between Ontario, Canada and the United States. Horseshoe Falls is shown here. The falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world, with a vertical drop of more than 165 feet (50 m). The Maid of the Mist boat, visible here, has carried passengers into the rapids immediately below the falls since 1846 Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Victorville: The Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville, California, is a massive transitional hub for commercial aircraft. The facility's boneyard, pictured here, contains more than 150 retired planes Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Moab Potash Ponds: The Intrepid Potash Mine in Moab, Utah, USA produces muriate of potash, a potassium-containing salt used widely by farmers in fertilizer. The salt is pumped to the surface from underground deposits and dried in massive solar ponds that vibrantly extend across the landscape. As the water evaporates over the course of 300 days, the salts crystallize out. The water is dyed bright blue to reduce the amount of time it takes for the potash to crystallise; darker water absorbs more sunlight and heat Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Burning Man: Burning Man is a week-long, annual event held in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada, USA. Drawing more than 65,000 participants in 2014, the event is described as an experiment in community, art, radical self-expression, and radical self-reliance. The developed part of Black Rock City, the temporary residence of the campers, is arranged as a series of concentric streets with the 'Man Sculpture' and his supporting complex at the centre Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Granada Olive Plantation: An olive tree plantation covers the hills of Cordoba, Spain. Approximately 90% of all harvested olives are turned in to oil, while the 10% are eaten as table olives Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Bourtange: In this Overview, we see the star fort of Bourtange, Netherlands. This town was constructed in 1593 in this manner so that an attack on any of its five walls could be aggressively counteracted from the two adjacent star points A new Overview is published each day here: www.dailyoverview.com www.instagram.com/dailyoverview Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Great Pyramids of Giza: The Great Pyramids of Giza are located on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. Dating back to 2580 BC, the Great Pyramid, the largest structure at the site, is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient world and the only one to remain largely intact. With an estimated 2,300,000 stone blocks weighing from 2 to 30 tons each, the 481 foot pyramid was the tallest structure in the world for more than 3,800 years Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Gemasolar Solar Concentraor: This Overview captures the Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant in Seville, Spain. The solar concentrator use 2,650 heliostat mirrors to collect and focus the sun's thermal energy to heat molten salt flowing through a 460-foot tall central tower. The molten salt then circulates from the tower to a storage tank where it is used to produce steam and generate electricity. In total, the facility displaces approximately 30,000 tons of CO2 emissions every year Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Eixample, Barcelona: The Example District in Barcelona, Spain is characterised by its strict grid pattern, octagonal intersections, and apartments with communal courtyards Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Brasilia: Brasilia was founded on April 21, 1960 in order to move the capital from Rio de Janeiro to a more central location within Brazil. The design resembling an airplane from above was developed by L˙cio Costa and prominently features the modernist buildings of the celebrated architect Oscar Niemeyer at its centre Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Central Park: Central Park in New York City spans 843 acres. That's 6% of the island of Manhattan Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Amsterdam: The canal system of Amsterdam, known as 'Grachten', is the result of conscious urban planning. In the early 17th century, when immigration was at a peak, a comprehensive plan for the city's expansion was developed with four concentric half-circles of canals emerging at the main waterfront (seen at the top of this Overview). In the centuries since, the canals have been used for defense, water management, and transport. They remain a hallmark of the city to this day Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Netherlands Tulip Fields: This Overview captures the blooming tulip fields in Lisse, Netherlands. The flowers are in peak bloom in April of each year Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Huelva Orchard: Fruit trees swirl on the hills of Huelva, Spain. The climate there is ideal for growing growing with an average temperature of 64 degrees and a relative humidity between 60% and 80% Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Pilbara Mine: The Mount Whaleback Iron Ore Mine is located in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. 98% of mined iron ore is used to make steel and is thus a major component in the construction of buildings, automobiles, and appliances such as refrigerators Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Almeria Greenhouses: Greenhouses, also known as plasticulture, cover approximately 20,000 hectares of land (more than 75 square miles) in Almeria, Spain. The use of plastic covering is designed to increase produce yield, increase produce size and shorten growth time. For a sense of scale, this Overview shows roughly six square miles. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Stelvio Pass: The Stelvio Pass is a road in northern Italy that is the highest paved roadway in the Eastern Alps with an elevation of 2,757 m (9,045 ft) above sea level. Only accessible in the summer months (June-September), the road and its 75 hairpin turns are sometimes scaled during the famous Giro d'Italia cycling race Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Roseville Yard: Roseville Yard, located north of Sacramento, California is the largest rail facility on the west coast of the United States. Operated by the Union Pacific Railroad, the yard accommodates approximately 98 percent of all rail traffic in the north of the state Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Marrakesh: The medina quarter in Marrakesh, Morocco is characterized by its winding, maze-like streets. Because the intricately connected honeycomb of alleyways narrows to less than a meter wide (~ 3 feet) at certain spots, the area is generally free from car traffic Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Plaza Del Ejecutivo, Mexico City: Radiating streets surround the Plaza Del Ejecutivo in the Venustiano Carranza district of Mexico City, Mexico Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Glastonbury: Glastonbury Festival is a five day music event attended by more than 135,000 people every year in Pilton, Somerset, England. The population of Pilton on the other 360 days of the year is 998. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Nardo Ring: The Nardo Ring is a high speed, 7.8 mile long, circular test track in Nardo, Italy. Each of the ring's four lanes has a determined 'neutral speed' and is banked in such a manner that one can drive as if the road were straight. Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock
Het Loo Palace: Het Loo Palace is located in Apeldoorn, Netherlands. 'The Great Garden,' situated behind the residence, follows the general Baroque landscape design formula: perfect symmetry, axial layout with radiating gravel walks, parterres with fountains, basins, and statues Picture: DigitalGlobe/REX Shutterstock

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Life