Wednesday 28 September 2016

Nutella, Anus and Lucifer: The most ridiculous names parents have tried calling their babies

Published 15/04/2016 | 16:52

At least two children have been named Superman in the UK since 1984, while 29 children have been legally called Gazza.
At least two children have been named Superman in the UK since 1984, while 29 children have been legally called Gazza.

This week saw a British man, formerly called Sam Stephens, win a battle to legally change his name to Buzz Lightyear which joins the myriad of stories highlighting the lax name laws across the water in the UK and indeed throughout the developed world.

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When it comes to bestowing their tots with the most bizarre monikers, some parents have really taken the biscuit and below are some of the most cringeworthy cases.

  • At least two children have been named Superman in the UK since 1984, while 29 children have been legally called Gazza.

 

  • Gandalf and Arsenal are names which have also been bestowed on children in the UK in recent years.

 

  • New Zealand’s department of internal affairs have rejected a number of bizarre names throughout the last two decades including Lucifer, V8, Christ and Messiah.

 

  • In New Zealand, requests to name twins Fish and Chips, Yeah Detroit and Sex Fruit were also rejected.

 

  • In Sweden, parents attempted to register a baby’s with the name Brfxxccxxmnpcccclllmmnprxvclmnckssqlbb11116 which would be pronounced ‘Albin’, but this request was denied.

 

  • An attempt to call a child Venerdi, the Italian for Friday, was rejected in Italy in the past. In Norway a request to name a child Gesher, or Bridge, was rejected.

 

Fergus, Bartholomew, Carmel and Imelda are names which featured in the top 100 list in 1964
Fergus, Bartholomew, Carmel and Imelda are names which featured in the top 100 list in 1964
  • The name Chow Tow, which means Smelly Head, was outlawed after a family attempted to register the name, while in Denmark, Anus is on the banned baby name list after parents tried to bestow the name on a baby.

 

  • French parents were denied a request to name their daughter Strawberry. The name Nutella is also banned in the country.

Meanwhile, Jack and Emily continue to top the list when it comes to Ireland’s most popular baby names, but new figures released by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) have revealed the once popular names that are rapidly becoming extinct.

Fergus, Bartholomew, Carmel and Imelda are names which featured in the top 100 list in 1964, but in 2014, three or less children were registered with the monikers.

The new figures found that many names which featured in the most popular list in 1964 are no longer favoured by Irish parents who have become more adventurous with the names they bestow upon their children.

Bernadette, a name which once the fifteenth most popular name in Ireland, has dropped more than 700 places as just four children were bestowed the name in 2014. Three of less Irish children were named Carmel in 2014, despite the name being one of the top thirty most popular in 1964.

Ursula, Ronald, Nuala and Dolores have also rapidly declined in popularity since their heyday and there were less than three Irish children registered with the names in 2014, despite once featuring in the top 100. Just three children were named Trevor, Noreen, Cornelius and Kenneth in 2014, even though these were some of the most beloved baby names in 1964.

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