Thursday 23 February 2017

Breastfed children are better behaved

Stephen Adams

Breastfed children are more likely to be better behaved, according to an Oxford University-led study.

Researchers have found that those who are breastfed for at least four months as babies are 30pc less likely to exhibit a range of behavioural problems when they start school.

Such problems include anxiety, clinginess, bad behaviour such as lying and stealing, as well as being hyperactive.

Critics of such studies, which many fear stigmatise those who do not breastfeed, say that mothers that do tend to be older, better educated and better off.

But the researchers said their findings, reported in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, were after these differences had been statistically taken into account.

Maria Quigley of Oxford University's National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, who led the study, said: "We found that children who were breastfed for at least four months were less likely to have behavioural problems at age five."

Researchers have found that those who are breastfed for at least four months as babies are 30pc less likely to exhibit a range of behavioural problems when they start school.

Such problems include anxiety, clinginess, bad behaviour such as lying and stealing, as well as being hyperactive.

Critics of such studies, which many fear stigmatise those who do not breastfeed, say that mothers that do tend to be older, better educated and better off.

But the researchers said their findings, reported in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood, were after these differences had been statistically taken into account.

Maria Quigley of Oxford University's National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, who led the study, said: "We found that children who were breastfed for at least four months were less likely to have behavioural problems at age five."

Telegraph.co.uk

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