Life Mothers & Babies

Tuesday 2 September 2014

Amanda Holden shows off smiling baby Hollie ten months after fighting for her life

Published 09/10/2012 | 08:12

  • Share
Undated Pampers handout photo of TV star Amanda Holden showing off smiling daughter Hollie, ten months after the birth which left the Britain's Got Talent judge fighting for her life, for the launch the Picture A Better Future Campaign to help cut the incidence of newborns suffering from tetanus. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday October 8, 2012. The actress was pictured with her second daughter to encourage other mums to post pictures of their children online to raise money for vaccinations in a project which has seen Unicef team up with nappy brand Pampers. See PA story SHOWBIZ Holden. Photo credit should read: Pampers/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

TV star Amanda Holden shows off smiling daughter Hollie, 10 months after the birth which left the Britain's Got Talent judge fighting for her life.

  • Share
  • Go To

Holden - who has rarely posed with the baby - is launching a campaign to help cut the incidence of newborns suffering from tetanus.

The actress was pictured with her second daughter to encourage other mothers to post pictures of their children online to raise money for vaccinations in a project which has seen Unicef team up with nappy brand Pampers.

Holden, 41, was in a critical condition in hospital for three days following the birth of Hollie in January.

She haemorrhaged as doctors removed her placenta, due to a complication from a previous caesarean section, and had to undergo a transfusion. She lost 15 pints of blood in total.

Tetanus threatens the lives of around 130 million women and newborns in 33 countries, although the association between the company and the campaigning organisation has already led to the elimination of the problem in eight poorer nations including Uganda and Ghana.

Holden said: "It's fantastic to see how the efforts of mums everywhere have made a significant difference already, but it is also a reminder that women and babies around the world are still at risk and continue to die needlessly from a disease that can be so easily prevented."

Read More

Editors Choice



Also in Life