Sunday 24 September 2017

The secret to a happy marriage? Tell your partner they’re annoying

Mathematical research into marriage found that those who voice their annoyances and argue often rather than let problems fester are less likely to divorce.
Mathematical research into marriage found that those who voice their annoyances and argue often rather than let problems fester are less likely to divorce.
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Couples who have it out with one another on a regular basis are more likely to have longer relationships new research has revealed.

Mathematical research into marriage found that those who voice their annoyances and argue often rather than let problems fester are less likely to divorce.

Dr. Hannah Fry, author of Mathematics of Love, found that people who let their partner’s know that they’re upset or angry have longer, happier marriages.

"I would have thought that a really high threshold of negativity, where you let things go on and let your partner “be themselves” would be more successful. But the exact opposite is true,” said Dr. Fry.

"The couples who end up doing best have a really low negativity threshold. When things bother them they speak up immediately and don’t let small things spill out of control,” she said.

The new publication is based on research by a Washington-based researcher Dr. John Gottham, who analysed newly married couples for a number of years after their wedding.

The research was based on when a person felt like they reached their ‘negativity threshold’, the point in which they felt like they had to speak up about their frustration.

Dr. Fry advised that those who do have an annoyance to voice in their relationship should do so gently and supportively, rather than aggressively to avoid bruised feelings.

Online Editors

Editors Choice

Also in Life