Wednesday 26 April 2017

Family cycles 6,000km across Australia surviving on roadkill, foraged plants and fish

Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Patricia Murphy

Patricia Murphy

A couple who upped sticks to cycle across Australia with two children and a Jack Russell in tow have released a book about their adventure, which cost them almost nothing.

Patrick Jones and Meg Ulman left their home in Victoria in 2013 accompanied by their kids Woody and Zepher as well as their dog Zero on a mission to live off the earth and camp in as many places as possible.

Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily

The couple travelled more than 6,000km over 14 months, living off foraged plans, weeds and fish.

“I guess what we wanted to do is take our permaculture activism and our principles, through reading and studying permaculture and enacting it, and try to apply it to the road," Patrick Jones said in a talk at Melbourne Free University.

The couple have released a book “The Art of Free Travel: A frugal family adventure” which shares the secrets to the extreme budget adventure that allowed the family to explore Australia.

"The Art of Free Travel is the story of our family's home life and our 14 month bike ride to Cape York from Daylesford in southern Victoria, Australia," Patrick said.

Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily
Instagram Credit: @artistasfamily

The family are keen to keep their carbon footprint down, even when they are at home in Melbourne  and shower just once a week.

"We are not seeing ourselves as dropped out completely, not as total purists, but I believe that if the average Australian family lived without carbon input, we wouldn’t have a climate change crisis.”

Online Editors

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Life