News Irish News

Thursday 21 September 2017

World War fighters finally get recognition

Oran O'Brien plays the Uileann pipes at the annual Armistice Day commemoration at Glasnevin Cemetery in Dublin
Oran O'Brien plays the Uileann pipes at the annual Armistice Day commemoration at Glasnevin Cemetery in Dublin
Louise Hogan

Louise Hogan

THE family of the late Private Christopher Carroll stood before the memorial as they proudly displayed the three medals earned on the battlefields of World War One.

Like millions of people throughout the world they were paying tributes yesterday on the anniversary of Armistice Day -- the day peace descended over Europe at the end of World War One at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month" of 1918.

At O'Connell Tower in Glasnevin Cemetery a bugler sounded the 'Last Post', as the families commemorated the relocation of the World War One and World War Two memorials to a prominent position. They had spent years languishing in the back of the cemetery as those who served the Commonwealth armies had been marginalised following the 1916 Rising.

Walter Carroll, a grandson of Pte Carroll, told how his grandfather from Queen Street in Dublin had campaigned for the British Army in France, the Dardenelles and Gallipoli.

"He returned to Dublin in 1917 but he passed away from the injuries," Walter's son, Nigel Carroll, said.

"They got a bad time when they came home," Walter said. "It is brilliant to see them recognised."

Pte Carroll of the Essex Regiment, who died in April, 1918, is just one of 208 servicemen and women laid to rest in the cemetery whose names are etched on the memorial marking the devastating loss of life in the world wars.

Irish Independent

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News