Sunday 4 December 2016

While you were sleeping: Stories you may have missed overnight

Sarah-Jane Murphy

Published 06/01/2016 | 06:49

Jason Corbett and Molly Martens in 2009. Photo: Brendan Gleeson
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un signs a document regarding the test of a hydrogen bomb, in this still image taken from KRT video and released by Yonhap on January 6, 2016. North Korea's state-run television KRT on Wednesday released still photographs of Kim ordering the conduct of a nuclear test
Lorcan O’Reilly who was murdered in October 2015

The head of an international body set up to monitor a planned ban on nuclear testing condemned North Korea's fourth nuclear test on Wednesday and called it a "wake-up call" for the international community.

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North Korea said it had successfully conducted a test of a miniaturised hydrogen nuclear device, which would mark a significant advance in the isolated state's technological capability.

"This act constitutes a breach of the universally accepted norm against nuclear testing," Lassina Zerbo, head of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO).

"It is also a grave threat to international peace and security."

Read More: 'This is a grave threat to international peace' - North Korea tests its first hydrogen bomb

Meanwhile Islamic State fighters have managed to make their own thermal batteries for surface-to-air missiles, according to a new report.

The batteries have been manufactured in a “University of Jihad” in the de facto capital of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Raqqa, according to videos shown to Sky News.

Their development would be highly significant. While the group has captured large quantities of old missiles, few have been put to use as their batteries had decayed.

Isil have been pushed back in recent months in both Syria and Iraq thanks to their inability to strike back at air attacks from the western allies, and now from Russian jets.

Read More: Islamic State 'develop surface-to-air missile technology' with aim of shooting down passenger jets

Closer to home, the Irish Independent leads with a story on the Government's response to the flooding crisis, stating that they will offer more than €100 million to home-owners, farmers and business owners devastated by the recent flooding.

The Irish Independent also features a photograph of Saoirse Ronan, pictured with Susan Sarandon at the New York Fil Critics Circle Awards on Monday where the Carlow native won the Best Actress prize for her performance in 'Brooklyn'.

The Herald reports that the 15-year-old chief suspect for the brutal Halloween murder of 21-year-old Lorcan O'Reilly was hospitalised after being savagely beaten by a gang of youths.

Meanwhile The Irish Daily Star leads with the story of John Ryan, a barman from Tallaght who successfully fought off three armed raiders who then fled the pub empty-handed.

The Irish Times front pages covers the death of 34 migrants and says that their fate provides a stark reminder of the deepening crisis. Seven children were among the dead after a boat capsized in choppy seas. The paper says that 3,700 migrants died while attempting to cross the Mediterranean in 2015.

The paper also reports that a move by management at St James Hospital, Dublin to charge staff up to €500 a year for parking could result in a strike.

The Irish Examiner reports that record low interest rates are here to stay. The paper says that leading economists yesterday forecast that with eurozone inflation staying low, the ECB may only start hiking rates as late as 2019.

The Irish Sun lead with a story on 'gangland boss Fat Freddie'. Stephen Breen reports that the criminal has fled to Germany with the 15-year-old suspected of stabbing Lorcan O'Reilly (21) to death in October.

The Irish Mirror reports on a Cork family who say their home has been overrun by rats during the recent catastrophic flooding. The Dilworth family were forced to evacuate the property refuge in a nearby hotel.

The Irish Daily Mail leads with a photograph of Molly Marthens and her father Thomas Martens in handcuffs, as they face charges for relating to the death of her late husband, Limerick-man Jason Corbett.

The paper reports that the pair endured a tense moment when they came face-to-face with Mr Corbett's sister Tracey Lynch after being led into the Superior Court in Davidson County, North Carolina yesterday afternoon.

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