Saturday 21 October 2017

Waste firm disciplines staff for permit breach

CAUGHT ON CAMERA: A Greyhound waste truck is used for both black and brown bins
CAUGHT ON CAMERA: A Greyhound waste truck is used for both black and brown bins
Jerome Reilly

Jerome Reilly

Greyhound waste has disciplined workers after video footage emerged showing both brown and black household bins being dumped into the back of the same truck.

The controversial video shows the Greyhound waste bin lorry pulling up to a house in an estate in Galway city.

The employee is clearly seen tipping brown bins and black bins in the same truck on a number of occasions – after householders had gathered the waste separately into the designated bins.

The video appears to show breaches of Greyhound's waste collection permit, which states: "The permit holder shall ensure that source separated waste shall not be mixed, or remixed, during collection and all separately collected fractions be separately collected in its entirety and not mixed or remixed with any other waste fraction, and transferred to an authorised facility as referred to in Condition 2.3 of this permit."

In a statement to the Sunday Independent, Greyhound said its company policy is to use separate trucks to collect black, brown and green bin waste.

"On hearing about this breach of company policy Greyhound investigated this incident and within hours disciplinary action has already been taken against the employees responsible for the incident," said the statement.

"Greyhound recognises that its customers take a lot of effort to segregate their waste and the reckless behaviour of the employees concerned is unacceptable," said Brendan Mc Cann, group head of marketing. "We will, under no circumstances, allow our customers' commitment to recycling and segregating their waste to be undermined by the failure of employees to adhere to company policy."

They added that the incident had also led to considerable cost for the Greyhound company as the truckload contained compostable waste, which was significantly more expensive to send to landfill.

Irish Independent

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