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Sunday 31 August 2014

Tribunal hears former mayor Royston Brady ‘wanted to be like Bill Clinton’

Mark O'Regan

Published 11/09/2012 | 05:00

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Royston Brady, who is bringing a case of unfair dismissal against Roganstown Hotel Country Club in Swords, Co Dublin, wanted to appeal to the ordinary man on the street, like the charismatic ex-US President.

FORMER DUBLIN Lord Mayor Royston Brady wanted to become a Bill Clinton-type "role model" in a bid to woo voters, a tribunal heard yesterday.

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Mr Brady, who is bringing a case of unfair dismissal against Roganstown Hotel Country Club in Swords, Co Dublin, wanted to appeal to the ordinary man on the street, like the charismatic ex-US President.

And he planned to buy blue suits and blue ties to "portray himself as a true Dub", a former colleague at the hotel where Mr Brady was general manager told an Employment Appeals Tribunal (EAT).

Alice Hayes, who works as a bar supervisor, said she remembered vividly one occasion when he said that if re-elected he would "always go to the Dubs matches with his cap and his tie. That's how he wanted to be portrayed as a good lord mayor".

The tribunal heard that Mr Brady told "a large number of people" he was going to leave the hotel to "enter into a campaign" for the position of directly elected Lord Mayor of Dublin.

A representative for the company, said: "You told Ms Hayes you would be leaving, that you would be running for lord mayor, and discussed betting on your chances (of re-election)."

The tribunal heard that in March 2010, Ian McGuinness, managing director of the hotel, met with Mr Brady to "challenge the quality of his work".

Mr Brady said: "In the two years I was there I didn't receive a verbal or written warning; there was never anything documented."

An email sent by Mr Brady to Mr McGuinness said: "You seem a little confused as to my finishing date . . . it was always my intention to finish up at the end of August."

It continued: "You can take this as my official letter of resignation and finishing date."

Mr Brady -- who has since relocated with his family to the US in search of work -- argued that the email must be put in context, as only a few minutes before it was sent he had been let go by Mr McGuinness.

The controversial former Fianna Fail politician also claims the hotel had been collecting charges of €550 from clients for late bar licences -- but failed to submit applications to the District Court.

The hotel argues it was Mr Brady's responsibility to apply for the relevant licences. He began working at the hotel in April 2008 on a €70,000 salary.

The Employment Tribunal chairman reserved judgment until a future date.

Irish Independent

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