Friday 9 December 2016

Tánaiste horrified by misogynistic rhetoric on show during US election

Jane O'Faherty

Published 15/11/2016 | 02:30

Emily Logan, Chief Commissioner of the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission, speaking at the Safe Ireland Summit 2016 at the Mansion House in Dublin. Photo: Steve Humphreys
Emily Logan, Chief Commissioner of the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission, speaking at the Safe Ireland Summit 2016 at the Mansion House in Dublin. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Tánaiste Frances Fitzgerald was "horrified" by the misogynistic rhetoric used during the US Presidential Election campaign.

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President-elect Donald Trump came under fire during the campaign when he was caught on video tape talking about sexually assaulting women.

He dismissed his words as "locker-room banter".

Speaking at an international conference on domestic violence, Ms Fitzgerald said: "I am so horrified by the language we have heard about women.

"The underbelly of misogyny and attitudes to women that resurfaced - people might say they were there all along.

She continued: "It does tell us about the real position of women in American society and internationally...

Hozier attended the event. Photo: Gareth Chaney / Collins
Hozier attended the event. Photo: Gareth Chaney / Collins

"I'm really disturbed by so much of what we I've seen and heard in the last number of weeks in the American election."

The Tánaiste's comments come after Taoiseach Enda Kenny back-tracked on his criticism of Mr Trump's rhetoric, which he had previously described as "racist and dangerous".

Last week, Mr Kenny said Trump's comments had been "made in the heat of battle".

The Minister for Justice was one of several speakers attending SAFE Ireland Summit in Dublin yesterday.

Lynn Rosenthal, who served as the White House's first special adviser on violence against women, was a keynote speaker and said Ireland could be the safest country in the world for women and children.

Ms Rosenthal said: "We know that you are a country that believes change is possible."

"You did it when you passed marriage equality... I believe, as Ireland believes, that change is possible."

Ms Rosenthal also explained how she moved on from an abusive relationship to become a senior adviser to president Obama's administration.

She got involved in a local women's shelter when her then boyfriend tried to kill her when she was just 19.

Activist and entertainer Panti Bliss, and broadcasters Claire Byrne and Ryan Tubridy also spoke at the event.

The mother of a young woman killed by her best friend's ex-partner called for domestic homicide to be registered on death certificates.

Maria Dempsey's daughter, Alicia Brough, was killed in Limerick six years ago.

Irish Independent

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