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Friday 22 August 2014

Tickets secured? Now the hunt is on for Garth Brooks' body

Aishling Phelan

Published 07/02/2014 | 15:06

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The National Wax Museum is unable to reinstate its Garth Brooks display because most of its body parts have gone missing.

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The museum is keen to resurrect the full Brooks piece and is considering offering a reward to anyone who returns the missing body parts.

The country singer was a popular attraction at the museum at the height of his fame during the nineties but the wax work has been sitting in storage since 2005.

After the superstar sold out five shows at Croke Park for this summer, the museum decided to bring Brooks back to life.

Looking forward to returning him back to his former glory, museum workers were left disappointed when they only discovered his wax head.

‘‘We’re hoping to locate it by the time he comes to Dublin,’’ Marketing manager Lisa Jameson told independent.ie.

‘‘We’re working on it and we’re confident that we’ll find it but his body is yet to materialise,’’ she added.

The head of the wax work was found in a storage box about six months ago.

A thorough search revealed that his torso and lower body, formally decked out in jeans and a check shirt, had been lost.

The museum has since found the check shirt and is hoping to find the rest soon.

The museum’s storage warehouse was broken into after the museum switched locations and this may have led to the theft or destruction of the wax work.

‘‘When we were broken into the warehouse was seriously vandalised and a lot of damage was done,’’ she explained.

‘‘If we find it, it will probably have broken hands but we can fix that,’’ she said.

The piece could have been misplaced during the museum’s move from Granby Row to its current location at Foster Place in Dublin city centre.

Mrs Jameson explained that the heads of the wax works are stored separately to the torsos.

She said it would cost ‘‘thousands’’ to re-build the wax body and take up too much valuable time.

‘‘We might offer a life-time membership to the museum or perhaps a monetary reward for anyone who returns it,’’ she said.

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