Sunday 24 September 2017

The plush salon where cheat Lillis made lover's pulse race

Howth Haven, the upmarket beauty salon where Eamonn Lillis, who was convicted yesterday of
manslaugher, first met beauty therapist Jean Treacy. She no longer works there
Howth Haven, the upmarket beauty salon where Eamonn Lillis, who was convicted yesterday of manslaugher, first met beauty therapist Jean Treacy. She no longer works there

Eimear Ni Bhraonain

THE beauty salon where the husband of murdered Celine Cawley first clapped eyes on his masseuse lover is a curious place for the affair to have started.

Eamonn Lillis ventured into Howth Haven on his wife's recommendation. She went to the upmarket salon set on the harbour front for deep tissue massages. She regularly went to Jean -- who gave her a lighter massage -- as she didn't like too much pain.

Issues of 'Good Housekeeping' and 'Woman and Home' magazines are stacked neatly on the windowsill inside the clinic at 3 Island View.

But Jean Treacy does not work there anymore.

Three well-groomed women speak in hushed tones behind the counter. They are courteous but don't engage in small talk.

Prices are not higher than in other beauty salons, but it is clearly a place frequented by wealthy clients. The therapists give this away. They are older than the bright-haired young women that often greet clients in salons around the country.

Nobody is in the waiting room and the phone barely rings. A red brochure is the only thing that suggests this is a unisex salon. It lists the men's range of spa and salon treatments.

The owner, Sallyann, prepares the small treatment room.

Music is playing softly and the smell of aromatherapy oils fills the air. This is where Eamonn Lillis asked Jean Treacy what she was thinking.

Sallyann is professional. She answers questions about the weather and a nearby restaurant closing down. But she freezes at the mention of Eamonn Lillis before changing the subject. It's obvious the trial is the talk of the salon, but it is not discussed with clients.

A few paces away in the Gem Newsagent, an elderly man opens the Irish Independent and turns to Page Four. He stands in the doorway to read the headline: 'I didn't do it, I swear before God I couldn't do it to Celine', before handing over his €1.80.

Irish Independent

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