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Wednesday 16 August 2017

The four must-see gardens at Bloom 2017

Oliver Schumaan with his Garden Transition at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Oliver Schumaan with his Garden Transition at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien

Catherine Devine and Zainab Boladale

Colourful flowers, extravagant towers and stunning water displays are some of the main features at this year's Bloom gardening festival.

Garden designers from across the country are putting the finishing touches on their unique gardens ahead of the largest showcase of the best of Ireland's horticultural and food industry.

The designers are hard at work ahead of the competition which starts on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Here are the four gardens you don't want to miss:

Garden designer, Tunde Szentesi, who is originally from Hungary designed a garden based around the theme of Ireland.

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Designer Tunde Szentesi with her garden at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien

The project entitled 'My land, your land, Ireland' focuses on Irish agriculture, with a homely farm look.

Joan Mallon with Enable Ireland No Limits Garden at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Joan Mallon with Enable Ireland No Limits Garden at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Oliver and Liat Schumaan are putting the final touches on Garden Transition at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Behind the scenes at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Oliver Schumaan with his Garden Transition at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Oliver and Liat Schumaan are putting their final touches on Garden Transition at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park.Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Designer Brid Conroy perfecting her Despicable Me 3 garden ahead of the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Behind the scenes at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien
The Despicable Me 3 garden by designer Brid Conroy at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park.Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Designer Tunde Szentesi's garden is a work in progress at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Designer Brid Conroy with her Despicable Me 3 garden at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien
Designer Tunde Szentesi with her garden at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
General set up at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
General set up at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien
General set up at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien
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Designer Tunde Szentesi's garden is a work in progress at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien

Tunde told Independent.ie that the Irish countryside was her inspiration, focusing on fruit and veg as well as forestry.

"The garden symbolises the journey of producing food for us," Tunde said.

Brid Conroy from Co Meath designed a fun, kid-friendly garden based on Universal Picture's new movie Despicable Me 3.

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Designer Brid Conroy perfecting her Despicable Me 3 garden ahead of the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien

"In the movie Drew finds out that he has a brother and they're completely opposite. One is dark and depressing and the other is fun and cheerful. Their characters are my inspiration so I split my garden down in two and reflected their personalities.

"I've lots of dark purple foliage on one side and deeper tones. On the other side it's completely opposite with loads of colour.

"I'll have 80s music playing too to reflect the characters of the movie."

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The Despicable Me 3 garden by designer Brid Conroy at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park.Photo: Kyran O'Brien

Brid said that "loads" of work and planning has gone into her project.

"I've been here everyday for the past two weeks, it's a long process."

Oliver and Liat Schurmann have designed a stunning garden called 'Transition' based on their cottage in Connemara.

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Oliver Schumaan with his Garden Transition at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park. Photo: Kyran O'Brien

“My wife and I designed the garden. We were inspired very much by the coastal landscape around our little fisherman's cottage out in Lettermore.

“Lettermore is an island where you're looking across to another island and at high tide you see the two islands and the landscape behind. Then at low tide all these other islands and rocks appear and you have a drastic change of landscape. We were wondering how can we capture all this and put it into a large garden here at Bloom."

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Oliver and Liat Schumaan are putting the final touches on Garden Transition at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien

“So we said ok what we’ll do is create a vast rock landscape underneath the water and we’re going to have a tidal effect by reducing the level of the water about one foot so first you’re looking at green landscape, really quiet and then slowly within one hour the tide will go down and a new landscape will appear before your eyes that’s why it's called ‘Transition’.”

“This garden was created especially for Bloom. The rock was sourced only about ten miles away from a quarry so it’s Dublin based and we used about 40 tonnes of rock. The amounts of water that we’re pumping to and fro is about another 4000 litres so we have retention tank hidden away behind the garden with two pumps in it, so it’s pumping the water to and fro.”

Designer Joan Mallon designed a 'No Limits' garden to reflect her sponsor Enable Ireland.

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Joan Mallon with Enable Ireland No Limits Garden at the Bloom Festival in the Phoenix Park Photo: Kyran O'Brien

“The inspiration is from the children and the families of service users of Enable Ireland. We want to inspire people about living life with no limits.

"We wanted it to be fun and a playful kind of space, the helter skelter that you see in the centre, that’s a metaphor for what it’s like when you see the disability diagnoses with a child, it can be up down and arounds.

“The helter skelter also represents the fun aspect of it and the children I met with, they wanted a playhouse , they wanted a slide, they wanted all those things, so to be bringing all those elements together was a helter skelter. It’s kind of a feature I’ve been interested in for a while.”

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