Saturday 1 October 2016

'After the election, the political will might not be there'

Declan Rooney

Published 06/01/2016 | 02:30

Paul Moran finally lost the fight against flood waters at his parents-in-law’s cottage in
Kinvara, Co Galway. Photos: Andrew Downes
Paul Moran finally lost the fight against flood waters at his parents-in-law’s cottage in Kinvara, Co Galway. Photos: Andrew Downes
Flood waters in Cahermore near Kinvara Co Galway. Photo: Andrew Downes

Pat Moran was among the most recent flood victims to lose the battle against rising waters.

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And he warns that other homeowners are just one pump malfunction away from being swamped.

Mr Moran lost his battle with the elements in the early hours of yesterday morning as the five-foot barrier surrounding his parents-in-law's cottage in Kinvara was breached when his pump broke down.

Mr Moran says the townland of Cahermore, between Kinvara and Labane - where President Michael D Higgins visited on Monday - has been hit by a deluge of flooding far worse than was experienced in 2009.

"The flooding hasn't subsided at all, not down this end," he said. "Where we are, beside where they dug the channel to the sea - the hope was that work would take away all the water but the sheer volume is too much. The water levels are stable inland, but we are the last point of where that drop will happen."

The family's 150-year-old thatched cottage was engulfed by the flood water early yesterday morning, when his only water pump broke down.

Mr Moran, a local firefighter, says he knew he was fighting a losing battle.

"There can be no mistake about it, the water levels will be here for weeks to come. I'd be amazed if we are clear by the start of February, based on what happened back in 2009."

While Mr Moran was full of praise for the emergency response of locals and staff from the Office of Public Works, who have helped with the pumping of water, he feels that once the upcoming election is over, the political will from the Government to help out might disappear.

"I feel what's been done now is too little, too late. The work that has been done since January 1 as an emergency measure has been unbelievable, but no one seems to want to take ownership of it now. Come March or April the political will might not be there."

Irish Independent

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