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Monday 2 May 2016

Self-made millionaire killed in helicopter crash laid to rest in his native county

David Young

Published 25/03/2014 | 02:30

The wife of Lord Ballyedmond, also known as Dr Edward Haughey, Mary (left) speaks with Canon Francis Brown outside Newry Cathedral, Co. Down, following his requiem mass.
The wife of Lord Ballyedmond, also known as Dr Edward Haughey, Mary (left) speaks with Canon Francis Brown outside Newry Cathedral, Co. Down, following his requiem mass.
Northern Ireland First Minister Peter Robinson (centre) and deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness (third left) outside Newry Cathedral, Co Down, following the requiem mass for Lord Ballyedmond, also known as Dr Edward Haughey. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA Wire
The coffin of Lord Ballyedmond, also known as Dr Edward Haughey, is carried from Newry Cathedral, Co Down, by his sons Edward (left) and James, following his requiem mass.
The wife of Lord Ballyedmond , also known as Dr Edward Haughey, Mary (second left) with their children (from left) James, Caroline and Edward, outside Newry Cathedral, Co. Down, ahead of his requiem mass.
David Trimble outside Newry Cathedral, Co Down, following the requiem mass for Lord Ballyedmond also known as Dr Edward Haughey.
Dr Edward Haughey

A peer and leading industrialist who died in a helicopter crash was an example of what hard work and determination can achieve, mourners at his funeral were told.

Self-made multi-millionaire Edward Haughey was killed earlier this month along with three others when the helicopter came down shortly after take-off in foggy conditions near an estate he owned in Gillingham, Norfolk.

Also known as Lord Bally-edmond, the 70-year-old businessman, who lived in Co Down, was considered to be one of Ireland's richest men, with estimated wealth in excess of £800m (€954m).

At requiem Mass in Newry Cathedral, Co Down, Canon Francis Brown revealed the tycoon used his fortune for good, making many significant unpublished donations to charities and educational establishments.

"Lord Ballyedmond's death is painful for many people," the cleric said in his homily.

"Many people in Newry and far beyond are suffering a huge loss. They are identifying, in the best way they can, with the pain and tremendous loss suffered by his wife Mary, his daughter Caroline, his sons Edward and James, the Haughey family and Edward's many friends."

Best known as chairman and founder of Norbrook Laboratories in Co Down, the largest privately owned pharmaceutical company in the world, he had a range of other business interests.

"He was a self-taught, hard-working, determined individual who had a thirst for knowledge," said Canon Brown.

Stressing the importance the businessman's family held in his life, he said the "great influence" he had on others extended beyond relations and friends.

"Edward made many significant donations over the years to educational establishments and charitable organisations," he said.

"Most of these were never published and many charities and schools in the locality benefited. He had a keen interest in the development of the science subjects in all educational establishments."

The service, which was attended by hundreds of mourners, was held ahead of burial in his native Louth.

Declan Small, Dr Haughey's site foreman at the Norbrook plant in Newry, also died in the crash. The 42-year-old's funeral was held yesterday in his home town of Mayobridge, Co Down. Helicopter pilots Capt Carl Dickerson (36) and Capt Lee Hoyle (45) were also killed when the Agusta Westland AW139 came down in a field.

The cause of the incident has yet to be determined with the Air Accidents Investigation Branch examining the circumstances.

Press Association

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