Wednesday 24 May 2017

Seasoned Dubs stars set out stalls to launch rare auld book

Pat Gilroy on Dublin's Moore Street yesterday with street trader Rosie
Farrell, her grandson Lennon Owens (1) and his dad Ross Owens, to
promote the official Dublin photography book, 'A Rare Auld
Season'
Pat Gilroy on Dublin's Moore Street yesterday with street trader Rosie Farrell, her grandson Lennon Owens (1) and his dad Ross Owens, to promote the official Dublin photography book, 'A Rare Auld Season'
Mark O'Regan

Mark O'Regan

GET your bananas, five for a euro. Get your Sam Maguires, one for 16 years.

The traders on Dublin's famous Moore Street had a little something extra to entice passers-by yesterday.

Fresh from their All-Ireland success, stars of the Dublin football team, including manager Pat Gilroy and midfielders Michael Darragh McAuley and Eamon Fennell, took up their places behind a fruit and vegetable stall.

But it wasn't apples or oranges they were trying to flog. Instead, the street's greenest traders were launching a new book, the aptly-titled 'A Rare Auld Season'.

According to the publishers, the book is a unique collection of photographs capturing the thrills, spills and sheer delight of the team's landmark, and long-awaited, success.

But it's arguably the words that will persuade punters to part with their money.

There are interviews with most of the main orchestrators of Dublin's victorious season including Mr Gilroy, captain Bryan Cullen, and the Brogan brothers.

But goalkeeper Stephen Cluxton, whose reluctance to be interviewed has ironically become a major talking point in GAA circles, also gives his thoughts on that day in September, and that winning point.

Even the notoriously media-shy Mr Cluxton puts pen to paper to relive those heart- stopping moments before he stepped up to take that injury-time free kick which ultimately sealed Dublin's fate.

"You go through your routine, nothing else matters," Mr Cluxton says of his preparation to take that kick to secure Dublin's first senior title in 16 years.

"One free is just as important as the next,'' he adds, and it is likely that the fans on Hill 16 at that stage would have agreed with him.

"I treat all games equally. No one game is more important than any other. If we didn't treat the semi-final as important as the final, we wouldn't have been contesting the final,'' he writes in an unique insight into his philosophy of sport.

Unsurprisingly, he wasn't messing around with lettuce and cabbage yesterday.

Arguably less surprising was Mr Gilroy's confirmation that he will stay on as manager for at least another year.

"Winning an All-Ireland has been our goal for the last three years and to finally achieve that was hugely satisfying," he said.

"However, as much as we might be enjoying it at the moment, we will eventually have to move on and focus on next year."

Fair trade is no robbery, as they say.

Irish Independent

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