Tuesday 25 July 2017

Roma double murderer to be kicked out of country

Jim Cusack

Jim Cusack

A Roma gypsy with convictions in Romania for murder and robbery has until Tuesday to respond to a garda removal order seeking to deport him from the country because he poses a "significant" risk to the public.

If Noe Rostas, 36, fails to present himself to gardai in Dublin, a bench order for his arrest will be issued.

Rostas is being investigated following a series of violent robberies of homosexual men at night in the city centre this year. It is understood up to 12 men have been beaten and robbed after being lured into laneways off South George's Street.

Rostas has convictions for crimes dating from 1992 when he was sentenced to 12 years' imprisonment for the murder and aggravated robbery of an elderly man. His trial heard he bludgeoned the man to death after going to his house apparently in response to homosexual advances from the victim.

He received another five-year sentence for the murder of another elderly man in 1998 in similar circumstances. These and three other terms of imprisonment took place while he was a minor.

As an adult he has been imprisoned three times in Romania, ones in 2002 for theft, another in 2004 for robbery and another in 2004 for theft.

He was released from prison in 2009 and was reported to have come to Ireland in March last year.

He is from the town of Tileagd in Bihor province in north-western Romania and part of the same gypsy clan that arrived here in 2007 and set up camp at the Ballymun interchange on the M50. They were subsequently repatriated but many are believed to have returned to Dublin. The man was last known to be living in a house in the North Circular Road with other members of his clan.

At the time of his release from prison in Romania, relatives told reporters he had gone to Ireland and was "scrounging".

Gardai in Pearse Street detected Rostas's presence in Dublin as part of their 'Operation Retribution' set-up to track gangs of Roma who have been breaking into houses and offices and mugging people around Dublin.

They sought an order to deport him because they believe he posed a risk to the public. Such orders can take place in instances when foreigners with serious criminal backgrounds arrive here. The order is signed by the Minister for Justice.

Although gardai have been arresting members of the Roma gangs in considerable numbers they are receiving bail and free legal aid as all are declaring that they are unemployed.

Sunday Independent

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