Tuesday 6 December 2016

Revealed: Where Ireland ranks on the 'most expensive place to live' list

Meadhbh McGrath

Published 27/04/2016 | 13:17

The vote on funding raises a major doubt about the commitment
of credit unions that make up the league to the reform plan
The vote on funding raises a major doubt about the commitment of credit unions that make up the league to the reform plan

Ireland is the fourth most expensive EU state to live in, according to new figures from the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

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The report sought to measure progress in the Republic to offer a comprehensive portrait of the country’s social, economic, environment, education and health situation.

It found that price levels in Ireland were 22.3pc above the EU average, with only Denmark, Sweden and Finland ranking higher.

Although it remains an expensive country to live in, the 2014 figures show an improvement on our position in 2008, when prices stood at 30pc above the average, making us the second most expensive in the EU.

Ireland also has the lowest divorce rate of any EU country, at just 0.6 per 1,000 population.

We have the second highest fertility rate in the EU, with an average of 1.96 children per woman.

Just over a third of births were outside marriage, ranking below the EU average of 40pc.

The crime figures showed an improvement, as the number of weapons and explosives offences fell by 39pc. There was a significant decrease of 53pc in dangerous or negligent acts (mostly related to drink driving), with a 43pc drop in public order and other social code offences.

However, it’s not all good news – the report found an alarming 40pc rise in sexual offences between 2009 and 2014.

The Irish population is increasing at the third highest rate in the EU, with the highest proportion of young people. The proportion of people aged 25-34 that have completed third-level education is the fourth highest in the EU.

Although we have the second lowest proportion of old people, our life expectancy is growing, rising from under 58 years for men and women in 1925-27 to 79 years for men and 83.1 years for women in 2013.

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