Monday 25 September 2017

Rapist gets passport in prison

Notorious attacker also gained driver's licence before imminent release

Shane Phelan Investigative Correspondent

CONVICTED rapist Larry Murphy will leave prison with a passport and driver's licence after successfully applying for the documents while behind bars.

The disclosure has fuelled speculation that he plans to flee the country upon his release from Arbour Hill prison next week.

Murphy (45), who used a car for the abduction of his victim, is due to be released next Thursday after serving 10 years of a 15-year sentence for the brutal repeated rape of a Carlow businesswoman in 2000.

He is being released early for good behaviour. Murphy was investigated as part of Operation Trace, the garda inquiry into the disappearance of a number of women in Leinster, including Annie McCarrick (26), Jo Jo Dullard (22) and Deirdre Jacob (18).

However, he refused to cooperate with investigators and was never charged in connection with any of the disappearances.

The move by Murphy to secure travel documents is not unusual and has been done by other high-profile inmates in the past.

Wayne O'Donoghue is another prisoner to have successfully applied for a passport while in jail. Following his release after serving a sentence for the manslaughter of Co Cork schoolboy Robert Holohan, O'Donoghue went abroad to start a new life as a student.

The revelation that Murphy was able to secure a new passport is made in a new book by journalist Barry Cummins, which is due to be published in October.

Under the Sex Offenders Act 2001, Murphy must give gardai an address where he will stay upon his release, but it is understood he has so far failed to do so. He does not have to sign on at a garda station until seven days after his release.

Murphy, a former carpenter from Baltinglass, Co Wicklow, never sought counselling and refused offers of rehabilitation while in prison.

Detectives are to mount discrete covert surveillance on Murphy to keep tabs on his movements. The operation is to be coordinated by a senior officer.

Should Murphy opt to leave the country for good, he will be obliged to inform gardai of where he is going.

He must also tell gardai if he takes a holiday abroad for more than a week, so officers can inform foreign police forces.

Murphy abducted his 28-year-old victim from a Carlow carpark in February 2000.

He hit the woman, breaking her nose, before kidnapping her and driving her to a remote woodland where he subjected her to a series of sex assaults.

He then transferred her to another isolated location where he attempted to suffocate her to death.

However, he was forced to flee when disturbed by two hunters.

Last month, Murphy's brother Thomas spoke out publicly to say the rapist would not be welcomed by his family.

Thomas Murphy said he suspected his brother had been involved in the disappearance of the missing women.

"There's nobody gone missing (since) and I find it difficult now to believe that he wasn't involved. I can't put my hand on my heart and say he didn't do it or that he did do it," he said.

It's galling Murphy can get a licence: Page 25

Irish Independent

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