Thursday 27 July 2017

WATCH: Canadian PM Trudeau tries his hand at hurling as his Irish heritage is revealed

Dublin Senior Football player Ciaran Kilkenny,Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tries his hand at hurling in Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Dublin Senior Football player Ciaran Kilkenny,Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tries his hand at hurling in Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Dublin Senior Football player Ciaran Kilkenny,Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tries his hand at hurling in Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Dublin Senior Football player Ciaran Kilkenny,Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau tries his hand at hurling in Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joke about the Taoiseach's Canadian socks in Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney

Kevin Doyle and Kirsty Blake Knox

It was revealed that the rebel county can now claim Mr Trudeau as their own.

Trudeau's Irish roots were traced by genealogist Fiona Fitzsimons - who says through his mother Margaret Sinclair, Trudeau is a direct descendant of the Bernard family from County Cork.

In 1661 Francis Bernard married Mary Freake and had a large family consisting of 6 daughters and 2 sons.

Francis died in 1689 defending Castlemahon against a Jacobite attack in the Williamite Wars.

Prime Minister Trudeau is descended from their younger son, Arthur Bernard, who was High Sheriff of Cork in 1697 and M.P. for Bandon from 1713-14.

From here on in things get a little complicated with descendants emigrating to England, Singapore and Malaysia before settling in Canada.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney

In 1695 Arthur Bernard married Anne Power, of Mount Eglantine County Waterford.

 The couple had a large family, ten daughters and four sons, including Trudeau’s great grandfather Francis Bernard (their third son).

Francis's grandson’s generation relocated to Singapore and Malaysia, where they remained  for a century, until 1906 when the Bernards emigrated to Canada.

His Irish heritage was revealed after he took a tour of EPIC IrishHeritage Museum as part of his three day trip to Ireland.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joke about the Taoiseach's Canadian socks in Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joke about the Taoiseach's Canadian socks in Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has declared himself a feminist after getting some advice on the subject from Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Mr Varadkar and Mr Trudeau met in Farmleigh House today where they discussed a broad range of topics including free trade and Brexit.

Mr Trudeau also revealed he told the Taoiseach about the challenges he faced bringing women into politics before reaching the point where he was in a position to appoint a gender balanced Cabinet.

Mr Varadkar has been widely criticised for failing to promote women in his recent reshuffle.

The Canadian PM, who has frequently boasted about being a feminist, said he encouraged his counterpart of focus on building more female representation.

"It's not just the right thing to do, it's the smart thing to do," he said.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney
Taoiseach Leo Varadkar welcomes his first official foreign visitor, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to Farmleigh. Picture; Gerry Mooney

Mr Varadkar told a press conference he was "very impressed" by Mr Trudeau's approach to gender equality.

"Diversity leads to better decision making," he said, adding that he would like to see the number of female Fine Gael TDs rise from 12 to 20 after the next election.

He said many people have different definitions of feminism but if it means equality for men and women "then I'm a feminist".

At the conclusion of their meeting Mr Varadkar said he was keen to build stronger ties between Ireland and Canada, which he described as two countries dealing with big neighbours going in different directions.

He praised the Prime Minister's leadership, saying: "Canada has become a world leader again on the global stage."

Mr Trudeau said Irish immigrants had helped build Canada.

On the controversial CETA trade deal between the EU and Canada, Mr Trudeau said he understood people had concerns but it was a "great model of a progressive trade deal".

The agreement, which will end most trade tariffs between the EU and Canada, is the subject of growing protest from lobby groups representing farmers and society groups.

But Mr Trudeau said it would bring better jobs to both sides of the Atlantic.

"It is not just a great deal for each side but also a model to the world," he said, urging people to take an optimistic outlook.

Mr Varadkar said countries like Ireland had "much more to gain from free trade than we have to lose".

"It's not just a trade deal for big business. It's for small business and workers as well," he said.

After the press conference both leaders were given an exhibition of Gaelic football and hurling from Castleknock schoolchildren.

Mr Trudeau was also presented with a personalised Irish rugby jersey, a Dublin GAA jersey, a bodhrán and a pair of what the Taoiseach described as "Celtic socks".

He was also given a framed copy of the WB Yeats poem 'Lake Isle of Inisfree'.

Press Association

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