Thursday 20 July 2017

Tetchy Kenny socks it to them after facing questions over plans to quit

Taoiseach Enda kenny greets Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Montreal. Photo: Paul Chiasson
Taoiseach Enda kenny greets Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in Montreal. Photo: Paul Chiasson
Niall O'Connor

Niall O'Connor

IT was a day that began with laughter and curious questions over Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's choice of sock.

But it ended on a sour note as a tetchy Taoiseach Enda Kenny attacked the media for asking questions over his plans to step down.

"I can't believe actually that you have travelled this distance to ask a question like that," Mr Kenny said when asked whether he intended to announce the Fine Gael leadership contest at Wednesday's meeting of the parliamentary party.

Mr Trudeau, the young dynamic politician, simply stared down into his glass of water as Mr Kenny once again hit out at the line of questioning.

"I just said to you I can't believe you have travelled this distance to ask a question like that," the Taoiseach retorted.

The issue of leadership was of course in sharp contrast to the type of question Mr Trudeau fielded during the Taoiseach's visit to Montreal.

A close-up of Mr Trudeau’s R2D2 Star Wars-themed socks. Photo: Paul Chiasson
A close-up of Mr Trudeau’s R2D2 Star Wars-themed socks. Photo: Paul Chiasson

Just moments after greeting his counterpart, the many cameras present became transfixed by his peculiar choice of socks.

And it was during Mr Kenny's address to the Montreal Chamber of Commerce that Mr Trudeau finally shed some light on his forward fashion. The socks symbolise RTD2 and CP3O, the robot characters from the Star Wars movie.

"May the fourth be with you," he tweeted.

Mr Kenny will now travel to Toronto where he will sign off on what is expected to be his final foreign visit before handing over the reins.

Earlier, he focussed on the theme of Irish emigrants who chose Canada as their home from home.

Speaking at the Concordia University, Mr Kenny spoke of how emigrants used to take on French sounding names so as not to be detected by the British.

"There's is a real story to tell. And Canada is an essential part of that story," Mr Kenny said.

Irish Independent

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