Wednesday 28 September 2016

Justice Minister Frances Fitzgerald: Don't be tempted to fly off to fight with 'evil' Isil

Published 11/01/2016 | 02:30

Frances Fitzgerald: 'The message clearly is to anybody even considering it, is not to join forces with such an evil organisation' Photo: Steve Humphreys
Frances Fitzgerald: 'The message clearly is to anybody even considering it, is not to join forces with such an evil organisation' Photo: Steve Humphreys

Justice Minister Frances Fitzgerald has issued a fresh warning to individuals considering joining forces with Isil.

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Describing the terror group as "evil", the Fine Gael politician said Europe must remain on high alert over the "potentially very dangerous" threat posed by individuals returning from Syria and Iraq.

Speaking to the Irish Independent, Ms Fitzgerald said there have been people who left Ireland to fight in the conflict but who have since died.

Using the term 'Daesh' to refer to the terrorist group, Ms Fitzgerald urged anyone who suspects that an individual may be planning to travel to the conflict zone to contact the authorities.

"We have to take every action possible to disrupt, to end Daesh, that's the reality.In terms of any possibility of anyone who is currently in Ireland becoming a foreign fighter, or being tempted to go to Syria, as has been seen from other countries, there is only one message, which is that this organisation respects no one," Ms Fitzgerald said.

Message

"The message clearly is to anybody even considering it, is not to join forces with such an evil organisation. I would encourage families and communities to work closely with the gardaí, with the ethnic liaison officers, to share their concerns, if they are concerned about young men in particular, but [also] some women," she added.

Concern about the influx of refugees is also likely to have heightened as a result of the sex attacks in Cologne, Germany, on New Year's Eve.

Renua leader Lucinda Creighton yesterday said refugees being relocated to Ireland should be screened in light of the attacks: "I don't think it's xenophobic or unreasonable to say there should be screening, and there should be a process and mechanism in place to ensure that refugees are genuine refugees and not economic migrants," she told Newstalk.

Ms Creighton later told the Irish Independent she believes Ireland has "a moral and international obligation to assist in this migrant crisis" adding that "the human rights abuses that have been perpetrated against these people in their own country are unimaginable."

"That obligation, however, does not mean we ignore the reality that people may seek to abuse this process as we saw in the Paris attacks," she said, in reference to the Isil terror attacks on the French capital.

Irish Independent

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