Monday 16 October 2017

Fianna Fail has lowest spending on promoting women

Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin
Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin
Philip Ryan

Philip Ryan

FIANNA Fail spent less money promoting women in politics than any other party, according to recently released figures.

Micheal Martin's party spent just €7,000 of its state funding encouraging women to get involved in politics last year.

The Labour Party spent €43,000 and Fine Gael spent €24,000 addressing the gender balance in their parties.

Even Sinn Fein, which received less state funding than Fianna Fail, spent €36,000 encouraging more participation by women in politics.

The revelation will heap pressure on Mr Martin, who faced criticism when Fianna Fail failed to meet its own gender quota for the local elections.

The party hoped 33pc of its candidates would be women, but fell short by almost half.

There are only two female Fianna Fail parliamentarians.

However, a Fianna Fail spokesperson commented: "This figure relates to a proportion of Fianna Fail's overall spend on promoting women.

"The party invested on increasing its female participation through a range of measures, which appear under different cost headings.

"This includes training for female candidates and local area representatives, the recruitment of the first full-time gender equality officer, and spending on co-ordination of branches and members."

The spending on "participation by women" revealed by the Standards in Public Office (SIPO) shows Fianna Fail received €2.8m from the State last year.

As the largest party in Government, Fine Gael received €4.9m, and Coalition partner Labour received €3m.

The Socialist Party received €74,000 and People before Profits got €143,000.

Political parties receive funding under the Party Leader's Allowance, based on the number of TDs and elected senators.

Parties are also entitled to funding under the Electoral Act.

Irish Independent

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