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Friday 22 August 2014

Demand for co-operation as banking probe begins

John Downing

Published 19/06/2014 | 02:30

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Labour TD Ciaran Lynch will head up the banking inquiry
Labour TD Ciaran Lynch will head up the banking inquiry

BANK inquiry chairman Ciaran Lynch says is determined to banish the legacy of rows over nominations, and lead an effective probe into the collapse of the Irish banking system in 2008.

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As the 11 TDs and senators gather at Leinster House today for the first time, Mr Lynch said he believed the members would unite to deliver the most effective possible inquiry on behalf of taxpayers who had to pay €64bn to prop up the Irish banks.

"This opening meeting is about discussing a work programme and timetable. I believe we will begin in a spirit of unity and co-operation," Mr Lynch told the Irish Independent.

The Cork Labour TD, who has stood well back from the two weeks of bitter political infighting about nominations, brushed aside suggestions that the process is already damaged.

He said he was now captain of a team which it had not been his job to select.

Balanced

Mr Lynch said the committee members would today be briefed on legal, procedural, administrative, logistics and communications issues.

It will also hold a preliminary discussion on the development of a proposal which will go to the Dail Committee on Procedures and Privileges for approval and also talk about formal terms of reference.

"This is the first time that an inquiry of this type will be carried out under new legislation, the Houses of the Oireachtas Inquiries Act of 2013.

"I believe that we have a real opportunity to demonstrate that parliament can carry out a fair and balanced inquiry into events that impacted so heavily on Ireland and the Irish people," Mr Lynch added.

It is understood that members will be told of the importance of confidentiality in the handling of the inquiry.

It will also focus on a shorter timetable and work programme than some of the members have publicly called for.

Irish Independent

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