Tuesday 6 December 2016

Coveney threatens to introduce regulations if bin operators fail to enforce price freeze

Paul Melia Environment Editor

Published 21/06/2016 | 16:01

John Ward, Walkinstown, demonstrates against the bin charges. (Inset: Minister Simon Coveney) Photo: Doug O'Connor
John Ward, Walkinstown, demonstrates against the bin charges. (Inset: Minister Simon Coveney) Photo: Doug O'Connor

The pay-by-weight bin charging system has been shelved for at least a year.

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Local Government Minister Simon Coveney said that bin charges will be frozen until July 1 next year to allow household get used to the new charges before they are implemented.

In the next year, companies will be obliged to give customers two bills – one for their existing price plan, and another setting out how much green, black and brown bin waste they produce, and how much they would save under a pay-by-weight system.

Mr Coveney also threatened to introduce regulations if some operators failed to enforce the price freeze.

“The Government this morning agreed my plan to resolve the on-going issues around bin charging and the introduction of pay by weight.  The plan is a comprehensive one which will protect households and ensure that the introduction of pay by weight cannot be used by any operator to recover losses incurred through selling below cost,” he said.

The Department said the Government had flagged “significant concerns” regarding reported price hikes being imposed, which saw some households facing a doubling in costs.

A comprehensive public awareness campaign is also planned to help customers understand the new system. Those found to be producing less waste, can opt-into the new system.

“It’s vital that, if households become more efficient in segregating waste and reducing their waste bills, they will have the opportunity to choose to transition during this period to pay-by-weight charging or, if they prefer, they can opt to remain on their current price plan,” the minister added.

The Government will review pay by weight and the awareness campaign next summer, before deciding whether to proceed.

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