News Politics

Friday 19 September 2014

Candidate admits distributing 'name and shame' post office signs

Niall O'Connor, Political Correspondent

Published 20/03/2014 | 02:30

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Brian Finucane, People Before Profit candidate
Brian Finucane, People Before Profit candidate

A LOCAL election candidate has admitted responsibility for the controversial "name and shame" posters distributed as part of the ongoing row over the future of the post office network.

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A series of posters placed on the doors of post offices in recent weeks names several government TDs as having opposed a bill which pledges to support the future of hundreds of post offices.

The creator of the posters hung up in the Kerry North/ Limerick West constituency, People Before Profit candidate Brian Finucane, last night said they illustrated the "huge anger" felt towards the TDs.

Mr Finucane said he provided the posters to local postmasters who in turn hung them on their doors or inside their premises.

"The anger towards the government TDs is unbelievable. This is going to be a huge issue during the local election campaign," he added.

The prospect of mass closures, which was highlighted in a report commissioned by the Irish Postmasters' Union (IPU), has led to significant tensions between the coalition partners.

Labour backbenchers in particular have accused Fine Gael of singling out its ministers as being responsible for the future of the network, which is made up of around 1,100 post offices.

The posters in the Kerry North/Limerick West constituency name the three government TDs based there – Labour's Arthur Spring and Fine Gael's Jimmy Deenihan and Brendan Griffin – as having opposed an independent bill tabled by Tipperary TD Seamus Healy.

Mr Spring raised the issue of the posters with An Post last week, which described them as "entirely inappropriate".

However, Mr Finucane told the Irish Independent: "The message on these posters is factual. Arthur Spring and the other government TDs voted against the bill that called on the government to protect the future of post offices."

Irish Independent

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