Saturday 10 December 2016

Business as usual - if slightly late - as strike called off

Patrick Kelleher

Published 05/11/2016 | 02:30

Declan Corrigan, owner of Delphi Antiques in the Powerscourt shopping centre in Dublin Photo: Steve Humphreys
Declan Corrigan, owner of Delphi Antiques in the Powerscourt shopping centre in Dublin Photo: Steve Humphreys

Businesses scrambled to open their doors at the last minute yesterday morning after the planned garda strike was cancelled.

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Many businesses across the country had planned to close their doors, due to fears that the lack of gardaí on the streets could lead to increased criminal activity.

Joseph Appleby, managing director of Appleby jewellers Photo: Steve Humphreys
Joseph Appleby, managing director of Appleby jewellers Photo: Steve Humphreys

Appleby jewellery store on Johnson's Court, Dublin, had planned to close for the day; however, they were able to open their doors when the strike was cancelled.

They opened just an hour later than usual, at 10.30am.

"I felt that it was an inappropriate risk to take if there was going to be no or insufficient garda back-up," managing director Joseph Appleby told the Irish Independent.

"I didn't want it on my conscience that if something went wrong that it would have happened on my watch.

"A garda strike presents massive opportunities for criminals. When I knew that there was a potential for a garda strike I put all my staff on notice that we may be closed during that period.

"I felt that maybe the first day may not have presented as much of a security risk, but I felt that subsequent days would have presented an increasing level of risk as criminals became aware of the advantages of having no gardaí on the street."

Declan Corrigan, owner of Delphi Antiques in Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, said: "We're located inside a shopping centre and we have our own security here, so it's a little bit different for us.

"I don't think I would have felt safe to open a shop if I was out on the street."

Despite this, Mr Corrigan supports the gardaí even with the threaten of industrial action.

"I think that they've been pushed to a point where they had to do something. They're not being paid enough for what they do," he said.

"[The government] shouldn't have let it go this far. It's not something that's just been happening over the last few months, it's been going on for years.

"They've just been ignored because they've been told that they're not allowed to strike."

Irish Independent

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