Sunday 20 August 2017

Passengers left for 'five hours with no information' after one of Norwegian's first transatlantic flights was cancelled

Norwegian Air (Stock picture)
Norwegian Air (Stock picture)

Cillian Sherlock and Laura Larkin

Passengers were left for "five hours with no information" after one of the first Norwegian flights to the US was grounded.

A flight from Shannon Airport to Providence did not take off due to an aircraft technical issue.

Passengers had boarded the flight and remained on-board for around an hour before they were told they would need to disembark.

One father, whose wife and children (aged three, eight and nine) were due to travel to the US on the flight, criticised the "dearth of information" from the airline.

"Given the range of tools at their disposal it’s hard to believe the information gap that they had today for about five hours," he said.

The family waited in the airport for a number of hours before they were informed that the flight was to be rescheduled to fly from Cork on Tuesday instead.

A Norwegian spokesperson told Independent.ie: "We are extremely sorry that due to an aircraft technical issue, the planned flight from Shannon to Providence on Monday 3rd July was cancelled.

"We contacted the passengers affected yesterday and arrangements are now being made to book them onto alternative flights to Providence departing from Cork and Belfast later today."

The spokesperson said passengers were offered hotel accommodation at the airport, and a bus transfer has been arranged to take passengers from Shannon to Cork and Belfast airports for alternative flights to Providence.

Passengers were able to use a hotline number to rebook onto alternative flights and those who arranged their own transport to their airport will have the costs refunded by Norwegian.

"We would like to sincerely apologise again to passengers for the inconvenience caused yesterday and hope to have people on their way to Providence later today," the spokesperson added.

Norwegian has led the way with low-cost transatlantic flights and currently operates 56 routes.

Just last weekend the airline launched flights on single-aisle 737 aircraft between Ireland and the United States, including the first ever scheduled service between Cork and America.

Online Editors

Editor's Choice

Also in Irish News