Thursday 18 December 2014

Nine months pregnant woman sleeping rough on city street

Published 23/05/2014 | 08:05

Yesterday she slept outside the Rotunda hospital in case she went into labour
Yesterday she slept outside the Rotunda hospital in case she went into labour

A woman - who is nine months pregnant - is sleeping rough in Dublin city.

Yesterday she slept outside the Rotunda hospital in case she went into labour.

The 24-year-old Dublin woman was discovered walking around Mary Street at 11.55pm on Wednesday night by the Inner City Helping Homeless volunteer group.

“We found her walking around, she was very thin and after being unable to get a private hotel bed through the homeless hotline she was searching for a sleeping bag,” said Anthony Flynn, who set up the voluntary group last November.

“We found her a bed in Mount Brown but she said no as she was concerned for her safety in accessing that bed,” he added.

“All she wanted then was to get a sleeping bag and said she was going up to the Rotunda to sleep in the doorway in case she went into labour,” stated Mr Flynn.

A spokesperson from Dublin City Council’s Homeless Executive said their outreach services were working to link in with the woman and provide her with immediate support.

The group also came across a 20-year-old Dublin woman sleeping rough at St Stephen’s Green who had just given birth.

“She said she walked out of the hospital and back on to the streets and put her baby into care because she had no other options,” said local councillor Christy Burke.

PRISON

“There’s an epidemic coming down the road,” he added.

Homeless Dublin man, Nicholas Marshall (38), said he would rather be back in prison than sleeping rough. He was released from prison on May 7, and has had no success in accessing a bed at night.

“It’s mission impossible,” said Mr Marshall. “I left prison with €2 in my pocket at 7.30pm and had nowhere to sleep,” he added.

Mr Marshall, who attends an education course in Merchant’s Quay every day, uses the toilets in Heuston Station each morning to wash himself before attending his classes.

“I’ve slept in an underground car park, behind fences in Smithfield and in hallways. I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy,” he told

“I try night and day to get a bed, there are just no beds available and the phone line is always engaged, you’re told you’re number 33 on the waiting list,” said Mr Marshall. He has also made four applications for housing.

A spokesperson for Housing Minister said: “The tragedy of anyone sleeping rough is one of the main reasons she is determined to end long-term homelessness.”

Evening Herald

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