Sunday 25 September 2016

Warm weather to make a welcome return after flooding in West

Paul Healy and Majella O'Sullivan

Published 13/04/2015 | 02:30

12/4/2015. After very heavy rains the East End of Kilkee including the the roads around Kilkee Water World were flooded and the steps on the beach turned into a waterfall. Pic Noel Gavin/Press 22
12/4/2015. After very heavy rains the East End of Kilkee including the the roads around Kilkee Water World were flooded and the steps on the beach turned into a waterfall. Pic Noel Gavin/Press 22
The steps on the beach turned into a waterfall in Kilkee, Co Clare.

The balmy weather is to return this week after a deluge of rain hit the country over the weekend.

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Roads were closed and streets were under water across Kilkee, Co Clare, yesterday after heavy rain unexpectedly hit the town.

There was no need to visit Kilkee Water World as the area surrounding the waterpark became completely flooded from a nearby stream that burst its banks.

It was a damp reminder to those of us who donned T-shirts and shorts last week that Irish weather can be a fickle beast.

However, Met éireann has said that the warm weather is due to make a welcome comeback this week, with temperatures set to reach a pleasant 18C degrees by Wednesday.

Met éireann forecaster John Eagleton said the explosion of rain over the weekend was due to a "wave depression over the middle of the country", which had cleared Irish shores by yesterday afternoon.

"For the week ahead, it's not going to be totally dry but it will be very dry in most areas," he said. "There will be outbreaks of rain, particularly in the north-west of the country but it will be a relatively low amount of rainfall. High pressure will dominate and temperatures will be upwards of 14C to 16C degrees in the week ahead, with the potential to rise to 17C or 18C by midweek.

While the national forecaster admits that the week ahead is "uncertain" in parts, it said it expecteds only two to three millilitres of rain to fall.

Meanwhile, climate change is being touted as one of the reasons for a surprising discovery on a beach in Garrettstown, Co Cork, recently.

A dolphinfish in distress was discovered by two American tourists who rescued it before taking photos to prove their discovery.

The photographs were sent on to fisheries expert Dr Kevin Flannery, director of Dingle's Oceanworld Aquarium.

Dr Flannery said the discovery was the very first recorded sighting of a dolphinfish in Irish waters.

"In 1993, tuna boats fishing about 500 miles south of here got two of them but it is very usual that they would come this far and there's no way they should be found in waters where the temperature is only 10C," Dr Flannery said.

Dolphinfish are so-called because of their close resemblance to dolphins, with their round heads. They are usually found in off-shore tropical or subtropical waters and can grow to a weight of 40kg.

"We're trying to figure out how this happened because it's a very rare and unusual event," Dr Flannery added.

"It could be because of climate change or global warming or maybe it came in a current of warm water."

Irish Independent

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