Saturday 24 September 2016

The 'bangers' being sold online for as little as €170

No questions asked as cheap second-hand cars available - with no NCT or logbooks

Published 20/05/2016 | 08:34

Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie
Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie
Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie
Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie

HIGH-powered cars – some without a valid NCT or logbook – are being sold at rock-bottom prices online with no regulations governing their condition or who can buy them.

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An online search for second-hand cars has thrown up thousands of vehicles that can be easily bought for cash – with no questions asked.

Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie
Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie

A case in the Dublin Coroner’s Court this week heard how 15-year-old Dayne Cody, from Ballyfermot, died when a 2.5-litre Kia Magentis, which was bought for only €400 online, crashed in December 2014.

False

The registered owner had given a real name but a false address and engaged a third party to sell the car.

Det Insp Richard McDonnell told the court that the unregulated sale of cars on websites such as DoneDeal.ie was a “major, major issue”.

Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie
Some of the used cars being offered for same on website DoneDeal.ie

Read More: 'Private motor sales regulation too lax' - website where deathtrap was sold

A search of the website by the Herald revealed an extensive selection of cheap, powerful cars in varying states of road-

worthiness for sale the length and breath of the county.

Someone with as little as €170 could drive away from a deal in a working car, though in poor condition.

A 2002 Nissan Almera with a 1.5-litre engine was listed on the site at that price, though the ad pointed out that it was not taxed and had no NCT. It also said there was no logbook available.

Read More: Cars bought on internet were used in three murders

When contacted, the owner said the car was drivable, but when asked for more details about its condition he said it had already been sold. It was removed from the site yesterday.

While people selling cars have no responsibly for how they are eventually used, there is little to prevent boy racers without licences or insurance from getting their hands on cheap fast vehicles.

Some of those for sale at low prices were high-performance cars with large engines.

A black 2000 Lexus GS300 with a three-litre engine was on sale for €595. 

The engine was described as “bullet-proof” though the ad also mentioned that it had a small oil leak.

It said the car had a valid NCT up to July, its tyres were in good condition and it was “the cheapest on the site”. 

When contacted, the car’s owner said it was being sold so cheap because of the high cost of tax.

“There’s a leak on the oil which I have to fill up sometimes, but other than that it’s perfect,” he said.

Also listed on the site was a silver 2003 Mazda6 with a 1.8-litre engine which was going for €280. It had an NCT that expired in March.

The car, which is in the west, had “slight damage to the front corner”.

“Car is starting and driving, but has been parked for a period of time,” the ad said. 

Crashed

In another case, a car that was clearly presented with a punctured tyre and in questionable condition was described as “good and solid”.

The 1995 BMW 3 series with a 1.6-litre engine was on offer for €400. The listing said the car “needed tidying”.

Dayne Cody’s inquest heard he was one of five youths travelling in a car that crashed into a tree on Station Road, Clondalkin, on December 20, 2014.

It had been bought online and the rear tyres were well worn, one excessively.

The corner said he would contact the Department of Transport to convey the jury’s recommendations, which included measures to prevent the selling of cars without a valid NCT and to underage drivers.

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