Friday 9 December 2016

Ten years on from liquid restrictions, passenger confusion still causing delays

Published 11/08/2016 | 02:30

The top six items given up by passengers at Dublin Airport are bottles of water, soft drinks, hand creams, make-up, sharp items and alcohol purchased as gifts, a Dublin Airport spokesperson revealed (Stock image)
The top six items given up by passengers at Dublin Airport are bottles of water, soft drinks, hand creams, make-up, sharp items and alcohol purchased as gifts, a Dublin Airport spokesperson revealed (Stock image)

Bottles of alcohol are amongst the most common items surrendered by passengers going through airport security.

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Exactly 10 years on from the introduction of restrictions on liquids in aircraft cabins, passenger confusion over liquids and the process of surrendering them can cause delays at security queues at peak times.

The top six items given up by passengers at Dublin Airport are bottles of water, soft drinks, hand creams, make-up, sharp items and alcohol purchased as gifts, a Dublin Airport spokesperson revealed.

He pointed out that no items are "confiscated" - instead passengers are "advised that they cannot carry them through security". They could pass the items to family or friends remaining behind - or opt not to travel at all, he explained.

None of the main Irish airports keep figures on the volume of liquids seized each year - but it is understood to be substantial.

Restrictions were first imposed in August 2006 following revelations of a plot to blow up transatlantic jets using explosive material hidden in soft drink bottles.

"These regulations have been in place for 10 years now and we'd encourage passengers to familiarise themselves with these regulations, which are not set by us and are EU-wide," said the spokesperson at Dublin Airport.

The rules state that no more than 100ml of liquids can be carried in a container, that containers must be in a single, transparent, resealable plastic bag, which holds no more than a litre and measures approximately 20cm x 20cm.

And contents must fit comfortably inside the bag so it can be sealed.

Unopened cosmetic, perfume and alcohol products are auctioned off each year by Dublin Airport to aid their charity partners - this year's partners are Aoibheann's Pink Tie, which helps children with cancer, the ISPCC and ARC cancer support. Some €1.5m has been raised over the past few years.

With bottled water the top item dumped at security, Dublin Airport introduced airside 'honesty stands' two years ago, which sell its own-brand water for €1. The spokesperson said 92pc of people opt to pay.

Irish Independent

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