Monday 21 August 2017

Reforms in recruitment a 'slap in the face' for civil service

The Public Service Executive Union (PSEU) president Maria Ryan discussed the possible formation of a mega union involving the PSEU, IMPACT and the Civil Public and Services Union (CPSU). Photo: PA
The Public Service Executive Union (PSEU) president Maria Ryan discussed the possible formation of a mega union involving the PSEU, IMPACT and the Civil Public and Services Union (CPSU). Photo: PA
Caroline Crawford

Caroline Crawford

Mid-ranking civil servants are to lodge a claim for additional annual leave - in part to compensate them for increased competition for promotion.

The Public Service Executive Union (PSEU) president Maria Ryan hit out at the opening of recruitment to members of the public as a "slap in the face" for its members.

It will be seeking additional time off for members at executive officer level, who currently receive between 21 and 25 days' annual leave.

She also told its annual conference that civil servants would not wait until 2018 for a further pay restoration if the economy continues to grow.

She discussed the possible formation of a mega union involving the PSEU, IMPACT and the Civil Public and Services Union (CPSU).

Ms Ryan said members had suffered numerous cuts and substantial worsening of conditions since 2009 - describing the increases in working hours as "a particularly bitter pill to swallow".

Redress

She said the Landsdowne Road Agreement was a start to unwinding these impositions, but called for the unwinding of FEMPI legislation to be accelerated.

"Our message is crystal clear. If this country's economy continues to grow at the healthy rate that we are witnessing currently, it is not sustainable to maintain the imposition of emergency legislation and the pace at which the unfair impositions on public servants are lifted will have to be accelerated.

"Against a background of growth of 7pc-8pc, public servants cannot be expected to wait until 2018 to get some redress to this," she said.

She acknowledged that external factors including a possible Brexit and the delay in forming a government could adversely impact on growth.

However, she added: "Public servants were dumped on when the economy and public finances were in trouble and we are entitled to expect to see the benefits of the recovery, sooner rather than later."

To applause she told delegates the union would resist attempts to have pay determined by outside bodies rather than collective bargaining.

Irish Independent

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