Wednesday 7 December 2016

Plan to allow cyclists go in both directions on one-way streets

Published 03/07/2015 | 02:30

Cyclists who break red lights or use footpaths instead of the road will be hit with a €40 fine under new rules coming into force from July 31
Cyclists who break red lights or use footpaths instead of the road will be hit with a €40 fine under new rules coming into force from July 31

Cyclists who break red lights or use footpaths instead of the road will be hit with a €40 fine under new rules coming into force from July 31.

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Transport Minister Paschal Donohoe said that seven offences will be subject to fixed-charge notices, and that the move was designed to improve road safety.

And it is understood that the Department of Transport is considering allowing cyclists to use one-way streets in an effort to provide more safe routes across the capital. Many of the one-way systems are located in residential areas, and the plans would allow cyclists to travel in both directions.

The new fixed-charge regime, which will affect some 40,000 people who cycle to work every day, will not apply to children. It is also expected that gardaí will use their discretion in relation to offences committed by teenagers.

"We have seen that fixed-charge notices have played a really important role in positively influencing road behaviour for very many users," Mr Donohoe said.

"A number of these offences are already recognised in law. The objective is to make cycling safer and our roads safer for everyone else on them. I'm confident they will make a positive change."

Gardaí already have powers to stop cyclists on footpaths or travelling without adequate lighting at night, but were forced to summon them to court. The new system allows a fine to be imposed on the roadside.

Separately, new figures show that the number of people killed on the roads so far this year is down to levels not seen since 2012, a year when the number of fatalities fell to a record low.

Some 72 people have been killed on the roads in 2015, down 24 on the same period of 2014.

This is the lowest level of fatalities in the first six months of the year since 2012, when 162 people died over the course of the year.

What are the new offences?

  • Cycling without reasonable consideration
  • No front or rear lamps at night
  • Entering a pedestrianised area
  • Breaking red lights at junctions, including cycle traffic lights
  • Failing to stop for a school warden
  • Crossing a stop line at level crossings or bridges with red lights flashing

Irish Independent

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