Tuesday 6 December 2016

Pair of Langurs feel right at home in Cork zoo

Published 22/08/2015 | 02:30

Francois Langur monkeys Yinx (4) and Ki (3) on their newly opened island at the Asian Sanctuary in Fota Wildlife Park in Cork
Francois Langur monkeys Yinx (4) and Ki (3) on their newly opened island at the Asian Sanctuary in Fota Wildlife Park in Cork

Cork has always prided itself as the natural habitat of the 'True Langer'.

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While not an endangered species, the 'True Langer' - or die-hard Corkonian - is known for its love of all things Rebel-related.

But Cork has secured a new species of Langer - a pair of François Langur monkeys at Fota Wildlife Park.

Unlike the more traditional species of Langers, the new François Langur monkeys will not become inconsolable when Cork's GAA teams are knocked out of the championship long before the September All-Ireland finals.

François Langurs are one of the world's rarest monkey species and are found in north-east Vietnam and in two Chinese provinces, Guangxi and Guizhou.

Fota's new pair of males, named Yinx and Ki, both came from Twycross Zoo in the UK. They are the latest additions to the park's new Asian Sanctuary, which is already home to tigers, rhinos, spotted deer, macaques and warty pigs.

Fota marketing director Stephen Ryan said the François Langurs were expected to become one of the east Cork park's top attractions.

"The monkeys and gibbons are always favourites amongst the public as they are so active and these guys already seem to move around all day," he said.

The François Langurs are a smallish monkey weighing about 13 pounds.

They belong to a group of primates called leaf monkeys, as they eat large amounts of leaves. They even have a special stomach to help digest plant fibres.

Fota now boasts one of the world's most successful breeding programmes for endangered species, with the Indian Rhino and Sumatran Tiger the latest additions.

Irish Independent

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