Sunday 23 July 2017

New rules tighten up law on major events

Revised regulations were drafted following the cancellation of five Garth Brooks concerts in Croke Park last summer
Revised regulations were drafted following the cancellation of five Garth Brooks concerts in Croke Park last summer
Paul Melia

Paul Melia

New licensing rules around major events will not take effect until well after the summer's concert and festival season has ended.

Revised regulations were drafted following the cancellation of five Garth Brooks concerts in Croke Park last summer, after it emerged a licence had not been granted for all shows despite 400,000 tickets being sold. The changes, which take effect from October 1, reduce the amount of time given to the public to raise objections.

Instead of being given five weeks, as applied under the old regime, that now reduces to three, and names and a residential or business address must be submitted for submissions to be accepted.

The rules oblige promoters to first have a pre-application consultation, prior to seeking formal permission.

They also require a risk assessment to be produced, and prescribed bodies under the planning acts including An Taisce must be notified.

Tickets cannot be advertised or sold in advance of meeting with the local authority, and promoters who flout the rules will not be allowed make a formal application to host the event.

The rules also oblige this formal application to be made 13 weeks in advance of the proposed event, which currently stands at 10 weeks.

A final decision must be four weeks ahead of the event taking place.

More rigorous controls are also in place to prevent promoters from seeking additional nights at short notice. Again, they must seek a pre-application consultation before seeking formal permission.

However, there is also no requirement to secure permission before tickets are sold.

Irish Independent

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